Chinese spy­ing on Tai­wan

The Washington Times Weekly - - Geopolitics -

A mil­i­tary pros­e­cu­tor in Tai­wan on May 20 charged the for­mer di­rec­tor of the Tai­wanese mil­i­tary’s elec­tronic com­mu­ni­ca­tions and in­for­ma­tion depart­ment with con­duct­ing es­pi­onage for com­mu­nist China and ac­cept­ing bribes from his Chinese han­dlers.

Maj. Gen. Lo Hsien-che is the high­est-rank­ing Tai­wanese of­fi­cer charged with spy­ing for China since the 1960s, when sev­eral high-rank­ing of­fi­cials, in­clud­ing a vice de­fense min­is­ter, were charged with sim­i­lar crimes.

The pros­e­cu­tor in the case stated that Gen. Lo was re­cruited by Chinese in­tel­li­gence in Bangkok in 2004 when he was sta­tioned there as Tai­wan’s de facto mil­i­tary at­tache. Dubbed by the Tai­wanese press a vic­tim of a Chinese in­tel­li­gence “honey trap,” or sex­ual en­trap­ment, Gen. Lo, then a colonel and mar­ried, re­port­edly paid vis­its to Bangkok’s broth­els and was furtively pho­tographed “in com­pro­mis­ing po­si­tions” by Chinese agents. He then was black­mailed into trea­son and be­came a will­ing col­lab­o­ra­tor, the pros­e­cu­tor said, with a sub­stan­tial fi­nan­cial re­ward for each of the top se­crets he be­trayed to Bei­jing, to­tal­ing about $1 mil­lion.

Upon fin­ish­ing his tour in Thai­land and re­turn­ing to Tai­wan in 2006, Gen. Lo, al­legedly al­ready a paid agent of China, was pro­moted to deputy di­rec­tor of the Tai­wanese army’s in­ter­na­tional in­tel­li­gence af­fairs, deal­ing di­rectly with his counter- parts in al­lied coun­tries, in­clud­ing the United States. Gen. Lo’s ca­reer was soon boosted as he be­came the head of the su­per­sen­si­tive elec­tronic com­mu­ni­ca­tions and in­for­ma­tion depart­ment in the Repub­lic of China army and was pro­moted to ma­jor gen­eral in 2008.

Dam­ages caused by Gen. Lo’s al­leged es­pi­onage acts could be cat­a­strophic to Tai­wan’s de­fense and pos­si­bly to U.S. se­cu­rity col-

Dam­ages caused by Gen. Lo’s al­leged es­pi­onage acts could be cat­a­strophic to Tai­wan’s de­fense and pos­si­bly to U.S. se­cu­rity col­lab­o­ra­tion with Tai­wan in the event of a main­land at­tack.

lab­o­ra­tion with Tai­wan in the event of a main­land at­tack. Gen. Lo had in­ti­mate knowl­edge of and priv­i­leged ac­cess to Tai­wan’s air, land and sea bat­tle­m­an­age­ment sys­tems, elec­tronic code sys­tems and other cru­cial mil­i­tary se­crets. It is also be­lieved that the Tai­wan-U.S. joint elec­tronic war­fare com­mu­ni­ca­tions net­work known as the Po Sheng Pro­ject might have been com­pro­mised. This is the sys­tem Taipei pur­chased from

Pak­istani Prime Min­is­ter Yusuf Raza Gi­lani’s highly pub­li­cized, de­lib­er­ately timed four­day visit to China, which be­gan May 17, sent an un­mis­tak­able mes­sage: China and Pak­istan are both up­set over hege­monic and con­stant in­ter­fer­ence by Amer­ica with these two coun­tries’ in­ter­nal af­fairs. It also sends the sig­nal that the United States does not give them due re­spect re­gard­ing ter­ri­to­rial in­tegrity.

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