Weiner’s only hands-on ex­pe­ri­ence would not pay the rent

The Washington Times Weekly - - Commentary - Michelle Malkin

New York Demo­cratic Rep. Nita Lowey grimly as­sured re­porters be­fore his res­ig­na­tion an­nounce­ment that “there is life af­ter Congress for An­thony Weiner.”

But Weiner’s life has been noth­ing but Congress. Noth­ing but gov­ern­ment. Noth­ing but tax­payer-sub­si­dized self-per­pet­u­a­tion. In other words: the life of a pa­thetic pub­lic leech.

Amid vul­gar heck­ling brought on by his own reck­less be­hav­ior and smug jokes, Weiner told re­porters at his three-ring press con­fer­ence that there is “no higher honor in a democ­racy” than to be an elected rep­re­sen­ta­tive. But like le­gions of en­trenched swamp crea­tures, he’s lost sight of the sim­ple propo­si­tion that serv­ing in Congress should re­main a tem­po­rary call­ing, not a life­long ca­reer.

Last year, the now-job­less Weiner joked on for­mer room­mate Jon Ste­wart’s cable com­edy show that he didn’t “have a lot of mar­ketable skills.” It’s one of Weiner’s rare truth­ful ut­ter­ances over the past year. A pro­tege of fos­silized New York Sen. Charles Schumer, Weiner has spent the past 20 years in pol­i­tics, straight out of col­lege to the present. Through seven con­sec­u­tive con­gres­sional terms, he has stri­dently ad­vo­cated jobkilling poli­cies in the name of the work­ing class, about which this rul­ing-class elit­ist knows noth­ing.

Po­tomac Fever is a bi­par­ti­san disease, of course. And the Found­ing Fathers were rightly con­cerned about its cor­rupt­ing con­se­quences.

At Vir­ginia’s rat­i­fy­ing con­ven­tion in 1788, Ge­orge Ma­son made the case for a cit­i­zen leg­is­la­ture grounded in re­al­ity: “Noth­ing so strongly im­pels a man to re­gard the in­ter­est of his con­stituents, as the cer­tainty of re­turn­ing to the gen­eral mass of the peo­ple, from whence he was taken, where he must par­tic­i­pate in their bur­dens.”

But make no mis­take: Weiner has no plans of toil­ing among the masses. His res­ig­na­tion speech sounded like a fu­ture cam­paign kick-off: “I’ll be look­ing for other ways to con­trib­ute my tal­ents,” he sig­naled, “so that we live up to that most New York and Amer­i­can of ideals. The ideal that a fam­ily, a com­mu­nity and, ul­ti­mately, a coun­try is the one thing that unites us. The one thing that we’re all fo­cused on. With God’s help and with hard work, we will all be suc­cess­ful.”

How, ex­actly, is a se­rial liar who an­tag­o­nized his own lib­eral me­dia al­lies by call­ing them “jack­asses,” who coun­te­nanced li­belous at­tacks on con­ser­va­tive blog­gers and who threw his own fam­ily un­der the bus to save his po­lit­i­cal hide in a po­si­tion to “unite” us all?

And what, pray tell, are these “tal­ents” of which he speaks?

A lucky ben­e­fi­ciary of the New York Demo­cratic po­lit­i­cal ma­chin­ery, Weiner has no law de­gree.

He has no busi­ness back­ground.

No pri­vate-sec­tor pro­fi­cien­cies to pay the bills.

And no hands-on ex­pe­ri­ence,

When not an­chored to Twit­ter scop­ing out fawn­ing young groupies or snap­ping Black­Berry pho­tos of him­self at the House gym, Weiner served faith­fully as one of lib­er­al­ism’s loud­est mouths op­pos­ing en­ti­tle­ment and debt re­form. He mar­ried an­other ca­reer po­lit­i­cal ser­vant, Clin­ton in­ti­mate Huma Abe­din, who has worked in gov­ern­ment since tak­ing on a White House in­tern­ship in 1996.

other than the R-rated kind, that is.

When not an­chored to Twit­ter scop­ing out fawn­ing young groupies or snap­ping Black- Berry pho­tos of him­self at the House gym, Weiner served faith­fully as one of lib­er­al­ism’s loud­est mouths op­pos­ing en­ti­tle­ment and debt re­form. Mean­while, he locked in his pub­lic pen­sion and racked up hefty pri­vate credit-card bills. (Fi­nan­cial dis­clo­sure forms show he owes some $15,000 on an an­nual salary of less than $200,000.)

He mar­ried an­other ca­reer po­lit­i­cal ser­vant, Clin­ton in­ti­mate Huma Abe­din, who has worked in gov­ern­ment since tak­ing on a White House in­tern­ship in 1996.

Now, they are ex­pect­ing a child, and he is count­ing on the Belt­way/Big Ap­ple re­volv­ing door to put food on the ta­ble. His­tory, alas, is on his side. The in­cum­bency racket eter­nally re­wards big spenders and big re­dis­trib­u­tors of col­lec­tive wealth.

Among all the other sor­did lessons Weiner-gate has taught us, it has re­minded us that the pro­gres­sive no­tion of “pub­lic ser­vice” is re­ally pri­vate-job pro­tec­tion­ism on the pub­lic’s dime.

Michelle Malkin is the au­thor of “Cul­ture of Corruption: Obama and his Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks & Cronies” (Reg­n­ery 2010).

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