CIVIL (WAR) BE­HAV­IOR

The Washington Times Weekly - - Politics -

Yes, most ev­ery­one knows the de­tails of the Get­tys­burg Ad­dress or the Bat­tle of An­ti­etam. But there’s al­ways a back story. Mary­land out­doors­man, hu­morist and his­to­rian Tim Row­land has penned “Strange and Ob­scure Sto­ries of the Civil War,” pub­lished by Sky­horse and on book­shelves Sept. 27.

These are the Civil War sto­ries and mis­ad­ven­tures that “don’t get told,” Mr. Row­land says — like the num­ber of horses killed in con­flict, the “me­dieval slugfest” that was the Bat­tle of Franklin, Tenn., an anal­y­sis of the role cof­fee played in the North­ern vic­tory and this par­tic­u­lar vi­gnette:

“Two women suc­cess­fully posed as men and served as soldiers, un­til they made a ma­jor mis­take — they got drunk and fell in a creek, which at­tracted the at­ten­tion of the au­thor­i­ties.”

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