MIND­ING THE MORAL VO­CAB­U­LARY

The Washington Times Weekly - - Politics -

Be­hold: some­one has no­ticed that talk of what’s ac­tu­ally right or wrong in the pub­lic square is a rare thing in­deed. Re­li­gion scholar Robin Lovin ar­rives at the Li­brary of Congress later this month to ar­gue that con­tem­po­rary pol­i­tics is plagued by “a shrink­ing moral vo­cab­u­lary,” and of­fer ways to re­verse the phe­nom­e­non.

“Re­li­gious as­pi­ra­tions, prophetic in­dict­ments and even the con­cept of the com­mon good have been pushed to the mar­gins of pub­lic rea­son,” Mr. Lovin says. “At the same time, the in­sti­tu­tions that shape lives and con­nect per­sons to the wider so­ci­ety — schools, mu­se­ums, con­gre­ga­tions, com­mu­nity or­ga­ni­za­tions — tend to dis­ap­pear from po­lit­i­cal con­sid­er­a­tion.”

He’ll make his case at the au­gust li­brary on Jan. 23. Mr. Lovin is di­rec­tor of re­search at the Center of The­o­log­i­cal In­quiry and an emer­i­tus pro­fes­sor at South­ern Methodist Univer­sity who has writ­ten widely on 20th­cen­tury Chris­tian so­cial ethics.

Ed­ward Snow­den

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