BUG­GING OUT

The Washington Times Weekly - - Politics -

Be pre­pared. Be very pre­pared. A ver­i­ta­ble swarm of academes hopes to steer Amer­i­cans to­ward eat­ing bugs. Whoops. We mean “food in­sects.” Con­sider that crick­ets, they say, con­tain as much omega-3 fatty acids as sal­mon. The idea was pre­sented re­cently be­fore the In­sti­tute of Food Tech­nol­o­gists’ an­nual meet­ing.

“In­sects re­quire less feed, less wa­ter, less land, and less en­ergy to pro­duce and their pro­duc­tion gen­er­ates sub­stan­tially lower en­vi­ron­men­tal pol­lu­tants, such as pes­ti­cides and green­house gases,” says Aaron Dossey, founder of All Things Bugs, a source for protein-rich in­sect pow­der for commercial use. Amer­i­cans will likely balk over bugs food sources, which can in­clude lo­custs, grasshop­pers, crick­ets, and as­sorted lar­vae.

“We have to over­come the ‘ick’ fac­tor,” says Lau­rie Keeler, a food specialist at the Univer­sity of Ne­braska. “It’s a cul­tural bar­rier that has to be over­come. We have spent a lot of time wor­ried about in­sects get­ting into food; now we want to en­cour­age eat­ing in­sects as food.”

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