See­ing Is Be­liev­ing

With de­tailed plans in hand, the crew blends ma­te­ri­als to fin­ish of the ex­te­rior of the home.

Timber Home Living - - Contents - BY SARA BROWN | PHOTOS AND PLANS COURTESY OF CANA­DIAN TIMBERFRAMES

With de­tailed plans in hand, the crew blends ma­te­ri­als to fin­ish of the ex­te­rior of the home.

With the ma­jor struc­tural elements in place at the Lake of Bays project in On­tario, Canada, it was time to fin­ish out the home’s shell — a process that re­lied heav­ily on that all-im­por­tant el­e­ment of tim­ing.

“To elim­i­nate ma­te­rial dam­age or is­sues on­site, we stay closely con­nected to the crew, and we sched­ule de­liv­er­ies for when the builder is al­most ready to walk them into the dried-in shell,” ex­plains Jeff Bowes, owner of Cana­dian Timberframes, the com­pany be­hind the project. “Once the pan­els and the roof were in place, the win­dows and doors were de­liv­ered; then we got to work on fin­ish­ing the rest of the house.”

To se­lect the ma­te­ri­als for the ex­te­rior of the home, Jeff worked with the own­ers long be­fore they broke ground, fi­nal­iz­ing choices with the help of a so­phis­ti­cated 3D ren­der­ing pro­gram. “We have an en­tire li­brary of fin­ishes in our of­fice, so we can pop­u­late each in­di­vid­ual draw­ing ac­cu­rately, al­low­ing the client to look at the de­tails even closer,” Jeff ex­plains. “This way, you’re not just look­ing at a tiny sam­ple or color swatch, but a re­al­is­tic de­pic­tion of how the fin­ished house will ac­tu­ally look with those ma­te­ri­als in place.”

This type of process is par­tic­u­larly help­ful when de­sign­ing va­ca­tion homes, where months can go by with­out the own­ers vis­it­ing the site. “Our of­fice is in British Co­lum­bia, and the house is lo­cated clear across the coun­try in On­tario, so this all had to be done re­motely,” Jeff adds. “With this type of pro­gram, we’re all look­ing at the same vir­tual house, no mat­ter where our cur­rent lo­ca­tion might be.”

STONE & SID­ING

To achieve the moun­tain style they were go­ing for, the home­own­ers chose a na­tive stone for the home’s skirt­ing and ex­te­rior col­umns be­fore send­ing a sam­ple to Jeff and his de­sign team. To match the stone, Cana­dian Timberframes sent the own­ers a box of sam­ples of sid­ing, trim and cedar shakes to choose from.

“We send a wide va­ri­ety of choices so the home­own­ers can take a close look, mix and match and take their time mak­ing de­ci­sions. By the time we do the ar­chi­tec­tural sign up, they’re not just mak­ing choices from pic­tures,” Jeff says.

The home­own­ers ul­ti­mately went with a pre-stained, kiln-dried western red cedar sid­ing — a rus­tic-yetre­fined choice that com­ple­mented the gray tones in the stone. They also opted for a mix of both hor­i­zon­tal and ver­ti­cal sid­ing.

WIN­DOWS

As part of the de­sign process, the home­own­ers also worked with Cana­dian Timberframes’ in-house win­dow rep­re­sen­ta­tive to re­view their op­tions for choos­ing win­dows that would frame the lake views, but not break the bank. “When­ever we’re do­ing win­dow de­sign, we take the clients’ wishes and pop­u­late the de­sign with as many stan­dard win­dows and doors to make things as eco­nom­i­cal as pos­si­ble,” says Jeff. “Be­cause this house sits in a mild cli­mate with­out ex­treme tem­per­a­tures, we could go with mostly stan­dard op­tions in terms of size, shape and thick­ness.”

EX­TE­RIOR TIM­BER WORK

For the ex­te­rior porch ceil­ings and tim­ber work, ev­ery­thing was fac­tory fin­ished and clear-coated ahead of time, mak­ing for a very quick in­stal­la­tion. To ac­com­mo­date the mi­nor marks and blem­ishes that in­evitably oc­cur dur­ing con­struc­tion, ex­tra stain and clear-coat was shipped to the job site so the con­struc­tion crew could touch up any im­per­fec­tions, dust or dirt be­fore the house was com­plete.

In the end, be­ing able to vi­su­al­ize the way the com­pleted house would look long be­fore any stone, sid­ing or other ex­te­rior elements were in­stalled proved well worth the added ef­fort. “If you can’t see the fin­ished prod­uct ahead of time and some­thing winds up need­ing to be changed dur­ing con­struc­tion, that’s a pretty ex­pen­sive ‘oops,’” says Jeff. “A lot of home­own­ers would just throw their hands up and say, ‘I think I’m go­ing to have to live with it be­cause of the price tag.’ With to­day’s tech­nol­ogy, sur­prises like that shouldn’t hap­pen.”

In the end, be­ing able to vi­su­al­ize the way the com­pleted house would look long be­fore any stone, sid­ing or other ex­te­rior elements were in­stalled proved well worth the added ef­fort.

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