N. KOREA FIRES MIS­SILE OVER JA­PAN

Flight over Ja­pan comes shortly af­ter pow­er­ful nu­clear test

USA TODAY US Edition - - FRONT PAGE - Me­lanie Ever­s­ley and Thomas Maresca Con­tribut­ing: Kim Hjelm­gaard from Lon­don; Michael James from McLean, Va.; Jim Michaels from Wash­ing­ton; and the As­so­ci­ated Press.

North Korea launched a mis­sile over Ja­pan Fri­day morn­ing, one day af­ter the coun­try, led by Kim Jong Un, left, threat­ened to use weapons to “sink” Ja­pan and turn the United States to “ashes and dark­ness.”

North Korea fired a mis­sile early Fri­day morn­ing over Ja­pan, less than two weeks af­ter its most pow­er­ful nu­clear test ever, South Korea’s mil­i­tary re­ported.

The mis­sile was fired from Su­nan, the lo­ca­tion of the in­ter­na­tional air­port serv­ing Py­ongyang, North Korea’s cap­i­tal, and flew east­ward over Ja­pan, ac­cord­ing to the South Korean mil­i­tary. It flew around 3,700 kilo­me­ters or 2,300 miles, ac­cord­ing to South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff, and reached a max­i­mum al­ti­tude of roughly 770 kilo­me­ters or 478 miles.

Ja­panese For­eign Min­is­ter Taro Kono said it ap­peared to be an In­ter­con­ti­nen­tal Bal­lis­tic Mis­sile based on its range, NHK said.

Ja­pan’s J-ALERT emer­gency warn­ing sys­tem sent out alert mes­sages on Fri­day ad­vis­ing res­i­dents to take shel­ter in­doors or un­der­ground. The alert said that the mis­sile ap­peared to have flown over the Kanto re­gion, ac­cord­ing to NHK.

The gov­ern­ment was ad­vis­ing res­i­dents to stay away from any­thing that could be mis­sile de­bris, ac­cord­ing to NHK.

Pres­i­dent Trump was briefed on the mis­sile launch by chief of staff John Kelly, the White House said.

In a state­ment, Sec­re­tary of State Rex Tiller­son said that the mis­sile launch would “only deepen North Korea’s diplo­matic and eco­nomic iso­la­tion,” and called on China and Rus­sia to take fur­ther mea­sures against the Kim regime.

“China sup­plies North Korea with most of its oil. Rus­sia is the largest em­ployer of North Korean forced la­bor. China and Rus­sia must in­di­cate their in­tol­er­ance for th­ese reck­less mis­sile launches by tak­ing di­rect ac­tions of their own,” he said.

The North Amer­i­can Aero­space De­fense Com­mand, or NORAD, said the mis­sile did not pose a threat to North Amer­ica, and U.S. Pa­cific Com­mand de­ter­mined it did not pose a threat to the U.S. ter­ri­tory of Guam, Cmdr. Dave Ben­ham, spokesman for U.S. Pa­cific Com­mand, told USA TO­DAY via e-mail.

The United Na­tions Se­cu­rity Coun­cil will meet Fri­day at 3 p.m. in re­sponse to the launch, Reuters re­ported, cit­ing diplo­mats.

AFP/GETTY IMAGES

EU­GENE HOSHIKO, AP

A man in Tokyo watches TV news cov­er­age of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. North Korea threat­ened to de­stroy Ja­pan.

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