Artis­tic Restora­tion The cur­rent res­i­dent of Hatch­lands Park gave up medicine to fo­cus on art and mu­sic.

THE CUR­RENT RES­I­DENT OF HATCH­LANDS PARK GAVE UP MEDICINE TO FO­CUS ON ART AND MU­SIC.

Victorian Homes - - Contents - By Susie Kear­ley

Wil­liam made his for­tune work­ing for the East In­dia Com­pany. His son, Ge­orge, com­mis­sioned ar­chi­tect Joseph Bonomi to carry out al­ter­ations to the front of the house, the gar­den hall and stair­case hall. They also cre­ated a new en­trance to his spec­i­fi­ca­tions in 1797. Ge­orge gave the gar­den designer, Humphry Repton, the job of land­scap­ing the grounds.

A SCAN­DALOUS COM­PRO­MISE

In 1885, Ge­orge’s grand­daugh­ter, Beat­tie Sum­ner, gained no­to­ri­ety when she was found in a com­pro­mis­ing po­si­tion with Charles Hoare, a mar­ried bank­ing heir with five chil­dren. A court case and fi­nan­cial woes en­sured the end of that re­la­tion­ship, but Beat­tie did even­tu­ally marry crick­eter CB Fry and they be­came a celebrity cou­ple of the day. The Sum­ner fam­ily how­ever, had mount­ing debts, so in 1888 they sold Hatch­lands Park to Lord Stu­art Ren­del.

Lord Ren­del was the man­ag­ing part­ner of an en­gi­neer­ing firm. He had the house sub­stan­tially re­mod­eled, and in 1902 asked Sir Regi­nald Blom­field to cre­ate a new mu­sic room. Lord Ren­del re­dec­o­rated ex­ten­sively, gild­ing and col­or­ing the plas­ter­work and adding ro­coco dec­o­ra­tive ef­fects to the stair­case hall. He formed a new en­trance on the east front, knocked to­gether Ad­mi­ral Boscawen’s bed­room and dress­ing room to cre­ate a new din­ing room, and com­mis­sioned in­flu­en­tial gar­den designer, Gertrude Jekyll, to de­sign a new for­mal gar­den with a parterre.

Lord Ren­del’s grand­son, Harry Stu­art Good­hart-ren­del, in­her­ited Hatch­lands Park in 1913. Then in 1917, dur­ing WWI, part of the house served as an aux­il­iary hos­pi­tal with 14 beds. They were reg­is­tered for con­va­les­cent cases only, so the house was mainly used to care for re­cov­er­ing pa­tients sent over from the nearby Guild­ford War Hos­pi­tal.

Harry re­moved some of the fussy Ed­war­dian dec­o­ra­tions his grand­fa­ther in­tro­duced to the house and added two lodges, a sta­ble block and a tem­ple to the gar­dens. He gave Hatch­lands Park to the Na­tional Trust in 1945, but stayed in res­i­dence there un­til 1959.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.