LONG-TERM EF­FECT

Fol­low­ing the Cal­iber 110, launched for its 110th an­niver­sary, Oris has in­tro­duced Cal­iber 111, a lim­ited, mostly hand-made move­ment that de­buted in a model with the same name. We put it to our test.

WatchTime - - CONTENTS - By Martina Richter

| Fol­low­ing the Cal­iber 110, launched for its 110th an­niver­sary, Oris has in­tro­duced Cal­iber 111, a lim­ited, mostly hand-made move­ment that de­buted in a model with the same name.

— Oris launched in-house Cal­iber 110, the first move­ment of its kind in 35 years, to mark its 110-year an­niver­sary. It was fol­lowed by the lim­ited, mostly hand-made move­ment, Cal­iber 111, which de­buted in a model with the same name. e mass-pro­duced move­ment has the same dis­tin­guished frame as the ear­lier cal­iber, which now also pow­ers Oris’s pi­lots’ watch – the Big Crown Propi­lot.

e Cal­iber 111’s sim­ple, com­pletely pol­ished stain­less-steel case fits nicely on the wrist de­spite its larger size. e mid-sec­tion of the case flows gently into widely spaced, down­ward slop­ing lugs, en­sur­ing com­fort. e slope is grad­ual and from the side looks like the broad span of an arched bridge.

Fixed into the lugs is a high-qual­ity an­thracite-col­ored al­li­ga­tor strap with a sin­gle-sided fold­ing clasp. e loose strap end is fas­tened with dou­ble pins, mak­ing it twice as se­cure. e lat­eral but­tons used to open the clasp of­fer ad­di­tional com­fort.

e sil­very gray dial goes well with the an­thracite color of the strap, or vice-versa, de­pend­ing on your point of view. Its sun­burst fin­ish re­sults in an in­ter­est­ing play with the light, but some­times causes re­flec­tion due to the shiny ap­plied mark­ers and hands. is is for­giv­able in view of the over­all aes­thetic, and also per­haps be­cause both pri­mary hands glow very faintly in the dark. How­ever, the lu­mi­nous in­lays on the hands are vir­tu­ally in­dis­tin­guish­able be­cause of their sim­i­lar­ity in length.

The small sec­onds sub­dial at 9 o’clock makes its rounds, with a sin­gle dis­rup­tion by the date win­dow – a new ad­di­tion to the Cal­iber 111. e power re­serve is dis­played on the other side of the dial at 3 o’clock, in a 240-de­gree seg­ment with a much larger ra­dius. is now patented fea­ture was al­ready a part of Cal­iber 110. Upon closer in­spec­tion you can see that the dis­tances be­tween the in­di­vid­ual days in­crease in size as the power re­serve is de­pleted. is means that the hand moves from “10” (or fully wound) to zero at dif­fer­ing rates of speed. is has the ef­fect of be­ing able to read the crit­i­cal area of the power re­serve – when there are about four days re­main­ing – in a more de­tailed way, in­di­cat­ing the in­creas­ing need to wind the watch (as­sum­ing it is not wound reg­u­larly and/or on a daily ba­sis).

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