TEN-HUT

With the Her­itage Mil­i­tary, Longines dis­patches a hand­some soldier to serve on the me­chan­i­cal-time­keep­ing front.

WatchTime - - CONTENTS - By Alexan­der Krupp

| With the Her­itage Mil­i­tary, Longines dis­patches a hand­some soldier to serve on the me­chan­i­cal-time­keep­ing front.

— The Longines Her­itage Col­lec­tion of­fers ex­cit­ing op­tions for fans of me­chan­i­cal watches. e line con­tains watches in­spired by the brand’s own mod­els from by­gone decades and in­cludes divers’ and pi­lots’ watches, chrono­graphs, el­e­gant watches, and mil­i­tary watches. A time­piece be­long­ing to the last­men­tioned genre is the Her­itage Mil­i­tary, our test watch, which traces its de­sign to 1918 and thus to World War I. is was the era when strap lugs were first sol­dered onto men’s pock­et­watches so they could be worn on the wrist. e reasons: It was im­prac­ti­cal for a soldier to search among the many pock­ets in his uni­form to find his pock­et­watch, and even after he had lo­cated the time­piece, it was dif­fi­cult to ex­tract it while cow­er­ing in a trench or crowded aboard an over­filled trans­port ve­hi­cle.

ese early wrist­watches for sol­diers typ­i­cally had large lu­mi­nous nu­mer­als writ­ten in a type­face that looks or­na­men­tal rather than mil­i­tar­ily func­tional. Longines bor­rowed these his­tor­i­cal nu­mer­als for its Her­itage Mil­i­tary, but re­placed the slim Breguet hands of the orig­i­nal model with more read­ily leg­i­ble poire hands coated with lu­mi­nous sub­stance. e new dial – which is black – looks very dis­tinc­tive, as does the larger case with its wider bezel. And this is a gen­uine wrist­watch case, not a pock­et­watch case like the one used on the his­tor­i­cal model.

The po­si­tion­ing of the sub­dial for the sec­onds is less ef­fec­tive on the con­tem­po­rary watch than it was on the orig­i­nal. e nec­es­sar­ily small sub­dial is lo­cated too close to the cen­ter of the dial and too far from the edge be­cause ETA Cal­iber 2895 is much too small to ad­e­quately fill the 44-mm-di­am­e­ter case of this am­ply sized watch. e same crit­i­cism ap­plies to the date dis­play, which is also po­si­tioned too far from the edge of the dial.

Such lack of har­mony oc­curs fre­quently nowa­days be­cause stan­dard move­ments from the ’60s and ’70s are en­cased in­side pro­gres­sively larger watches. Decades ago, each move­ment was as large as it needed to be to fill the case of its watch: is en­abled a soldier to

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.