Peo­ple love to com­plain, too dry or too wet, too hot or too cold, hun­gry or over­filled

We are back to wish­ing it would rain. Seems like it has show­ered on ev­ery town around and left all the pas­tures dry. I don’t un­der­stand that, but I know it hap­pens. An­other thing I find in­ter­est­ing is the fact that the morn­ing dew is plen­ti­ful and ap­pears

Westside Eagle-Observer - - OPINION - By Bill

My air con­di­tioner is work­ing great! The great out­doors in my area is now in the throes of real sum­mer, temps run­ning over 90 and heat in­dexes in the triple dig­its. I step out for a few min­utes — walk­ing to my pickup for in­stance — and my clothes are pretty damp in­stantly. Then, when I go into the home of my close rel­a­tive, my damp­ness changes into a cloak of frozen ma­te­rial! I have not a clue about the set­ting of the temp on the air con­di­tioner be­cause I have been in dire straits for touch­ing it many times. I just suf­fer in si­lence.

We are back to wish­ing it would rain. Seems like it has show­ered on ev­ery town around and left all the pas­tures dry. I don’t un­der­stand that, but I know it hap­pens. An­other thing I find in­ter­est­ing is the fact that the morn­ing dew is plen­ti­ful and ap­pears to be as much as a light rain as a feller walks through it to the barn.

This sets up a per­fect sce­nario for hoof rot — not my feet but the cat­tle on any grass that is thick and deep. Hooves that never dry out are sure sus­cep­ti­ble to all kinds of bac­te­ria.

We went to a big horse sale this last week. A cou­ple of the grands are con­sid­er­ing them­selves to be in need of a faster, younger and pro­fes­sion­ally-trained mount. I have tried to ex­plain the dif­fer­ence be­tween a good cold-blooded horse trained by a good han­dler and the kind they think they want. We sat through five hours of high dol­lar horses, and I mean re­ally good horses and trained to han­dle.

The grands were pretty fas­ci­nated the whole time. They didn’t say much as we headed for the pickup to leave but be­gan talk­ing on the drive home. The shock fac­tor had set­tled in on the teenagers, one be­ing 14 and the other 13.

The ques­tions of why can’t we buy were taken care of. They had never sus­pected the cost of horses to be so steep. I be­lieve they will work on their owned steeds a lit­tle harder now. Horse and rider could both use some prac­tice.

The cows for spring calv­ing are about all bred. We will leave the bulls in for an­other cou­ple of weeks and then wait to see who is open and tak­ing a trip to the golden arches. I don’t have any de­sire to sell any of the cows but, if they are open, a feller can’t make them pay out for an­other year. The fall calv­ing herd is look­ing good — about three months and we will have some calves on the ground again.

It is my opin­ion, and ev­ery­one has one, peo­ple love to com­plain. I needed rain at the be­gin­ning of this col­umn and then com­plained about hoof rot a few sen­tences later. Too dry or too wet, too hot or too cold, hun­gry or over­filled seems to be the lament. I fig­ure on mak­ing the change in the morn­ing to a man who is thank­ful for all, and I in­tend to be dili­gent about it. I will not gripe about a thing, fuss about any­thing or nag the off­spring to hurry for a week and see if that re­sets my dis­po­si­tion. I will let you know how that works!

Bill is the pen name used by the Gravette area au­thor of this weekly col­umn. Opin­ions ex­pressed are those of the au­thor.

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