Lit­er­ary Tour of At­lanta

Where Atlanta - - CONTENTS -

Fol­low along as worlds from beloved books jump from the page and into real life. See where Mar­garet Mitchell wrote "Gone With the Wind" and ex­pe­ri­ence Dis­trict 9 from "The Hunger Games" in per­son. BY MICHELLE KHOURI

In the South, sto­ry­telling is as much a sta­ple as the sweet fra­grance of mag­no­lia trees. At­lanta may be known as the “Hol­ly­wood of the South,” but the writ­ten word held reign over this city long be­fore the moving picture. Af­ter dev­as­tat­ing fires dur­ing the Civil War burnt the city to the ground, At­lanta set out to re­build as a model for a more pro­gres­sive South. Schol­ars of ev­ery va­ri­ety helped to make this vi­sion an ev­er­last­ing re­al­ity. To­day, you can see the marks left be­hind by some of these bril­liant minds. From At­lantan au­thors whose homes are now per­ma­nent lega­cies to lo­ca­tions that make fan­tas­ti­cal worlds a re­al­ity, these are the perfect stops for schol­arly sight­seers. —MICHELLE KHOURI

“GONE WITH THE WIND”

The sprawl­ing Tu­dor Re­vival home (pic­tured op­po­site) didn’t all be­long to Mar­garet “Peggy” Mitchell, au­thor of “Gone With the Wind.” Rather, Peggy and her hus­band, John, rented Apart­ment 1 on its first floor. Visit the Mar­garet Mitch

ell House and Mu­seum to tour the apart­ment where “Gone With the Wind” was born, then ex­plore the mu­seum to view her per­sonal pho­tos and mar­vel at mem­o­ra­bilia from the 1939 film. Tours of­fered daily. 979 Cres­cent Ave., 404.249.7015. www.mar­garet­mitchell­house.com

“THE HUNGER GAMES”

With over 65 mil­lion books sold in the U.S. and more than $1.5 bil­lion in global box-of­fice rev­enue, this tril­ogy is one of the most suc­cess­ful lit­er­ary and movie fran­chises in his­tory. Best yet, the movie based on the sec­ond book was largely filmed in At­lanta. Visit the Goat

Farm Arts Cen­ter to bring Dis­trict 9 straight out of the page. En­ter the Capi­tol at the Mar­riott Mar

quis or visit Pres­i­dent Snow’s lux­u­ri­ous man­sion at the Swan House at the At­lanta His­tory Cen­ter.

PAPERMAKING MU­SEUM

The Robert C. Wil­liams Amer­i­can Mu­seum of Papermaking fo­cuses on the his­tory and crafts­man­ship of pa­per and book bind­ing. This mu­seum has one of the most com­pre­hen­sive col­lec­tions of pa­per and pa­per-re­lated ar­ti­facts in the world, in­clud­ing 2,000 books, wa­ter­marks, tools and manuscripts. Classes teach you to bind, mar­ble pa­per and more. Open M-F. Free. 500 10th St. NW. pa­per.gat­ech.edu

“UN­CLE RE­MUS TALES”

Long be­fore Joel Chan­dler Har­ris wrote “The Com­plete Tales of Un­cle Re­mus,” the Brer rab­bit sto­ries were be­ing pre­served by skilled African or­a­tors. As these sto­ries trav­eled with slaves from Africa to the Amer­i­can South, many au­thors put pen to pa­per to im­mor­tal­ize the char­ac­ters—but none were as pop­u­lar as Har­ris’. Visit Har­ris’ home, dubbed The Wren’s

Nest, to travel back in time to the turn of the cen­tury. Don’t miss ex­cep­tional sto­ry­telling hour each Satur­day at 1 pm. 1050 Ralph David Aber­nathy Blvd. SW, 404.753.7735. www.wren­snest.org

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This desk at the Mar­garet Mitchell house shows where “Gone With the Wind” was writ­ten.

Book bind­ing class at the Paper­mak­ing Mu­seum

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