CITY SIGHTS

Where Boston - - ART -

BOS­TON COM­MON CAROUSEL

Mount a Bradley and Kaye horse and take a spin on this art­ful, clas­sic carousel fea­tur­ing oak floors, beveled glass mir­rors and stan­dard pie top. Tick­ets: $3. Open Su-Th 10 am-6 pm, F-Sa 10 am-8 pm. Bos­ton Com­mon Frog Pond.

CAP­TAIN JACK­SON’S HIS­TORIC CHOCO­LATE SHOP

His­tory buffs with a sweet tooth can stop into this in­ter­ac­tive liv­ing his­tory ex­hi­bi­tion lo­cated on the Old North Church cam­pus. The store in­ter­prets the his­tory of choco­late, fo­cus­ing on how it was made and con­sumed in Colo­nial Amer­ica. Hours vary by sea­son; full sched­ule on­line. 21 Unity St. 617.523.4848.

FANEUIL HALL

Bos­ton mer­chant Peter Faneuil had this build­ing con­structed in 1742 and gave it to the city of Bos­ton. It be­came known for be­ing the breed­ing ground of the Amer­i­can Rev­o­lu­tion, and thus called “The Cra­dle of Lib­erty.” To­day, Faneuil Hall re­mains a sym­bol of free­dom and houses a vis­i­tor cen­ter, the Great Hall and an ar­mory mu­seum. Free ad­mis­sion. Open daily 9 am-6 pm. Fi­nan­cial District, 617.523.1300.

FORT IN­DE­PEN­DENCE

Five-bas­tion Fort In­de­pen­dence has been the site of Bos­ton’s sea de­fense since 1634, al­though the ex­ist­ing struc­ture dates to 1851. The pen­tag­o­nal fort was pri­mar­ily used for train­ing lo­cal sol­diers and con­fin­ing pris­on­ers of war as early as the Amer­i­can Rev­o­lu­tion. To­day, you can go in­side the Na­tional His­toric Site on free guided tours, or ex­plore the grounds on your own. Sea­sonal tours (meet at en­trance to fort): Sa-Su noon3:30 pm. Twi­light Sky­line View­ing Th 7 pm-dusk. Cas­tle Is­land, Day Boule­vard, South Bos­ton, 617.727.5290.

FORT WAR­REN & GE­ORGES IS­LAND VIS­I­TOR CEN­TER

This Civil War-era fort oc­cu­pies most of Ge­orges Is­land and is open to vis­i­tors. Daily ranger tours of­fer facts about the fort. Vis­i­tor cen­ter fea­tures ex­hibits and a short film. Open daily. Ge­orges Is­land, 617.223.8666.

THE FREE­DOM TRAIL

Fo­cused on the Amer­i­can Rev­o­lu­tion, from the Colo­nial pe­riod to the War of 1812, this 2.5-mile, red-painted and bricked path con­nects 16 his­toric sites, each of which has its own story. 617.357.8300.

GRAND LODGE OF MA­SONS IN MAS­SACHUSETTS

Did you know Paul Revere was a prom­i­nent Bos­ton Freema­son? Built in 1898, this Grand Lodge is the third on this site. To­day, the mag­nif­i­cent build­ing shows off ex­te­rior glass mo­saic pan­els that sym­bol­ize Ma­sonic themes, in­te­rior ex­hibits of Ma­sonic ephemera and other trea­sures, and a re­search li­brary, which is open to the pub­lic. Tours de­part M, W and F-Sa 10:30 am-2 pm. 186 Tre­mont St., 617.426.6040.

HAR­VARD SQUARE

Har­vard Square pulses as the heart of Cam­bridge, Bos­ton’s sis­ter city here in the Hub. The square is noted for its great peo­ple watch­ing, dozens of spe­cialty book stores, eclec­tic shop­ping op­tions, and also mu­sic clubs known for reg­u­larly host­ing leg­endary ta­lent. 617.491.3434.

KING’S CHAPEL BURY­ING GROUND

King’s Chapel Bury­ing Ground is Bos­ton’s old­est ceme­tery, founded 1632, and is full of re­tir­ing fa­mous Colo­nial folk, like Mayflower pas­sen­ger Mary Chilton. No­table fea­tures to look for:

Joseph Tap­ping’s head­stone, and Wil­liam Dawes’ tomb that bears his name but not his body. Open daily M-Sa 10 am-4 pm, Su 1:30-4 pm. Tre­mont Street at School Street, 617.523.1749.

LAWN ON D

Let the kids loose at this twoplus-acre art-filled play­ful out­door green space in the Sea­port District. There’s al­ways some­thing go­ing on, from Swing Time (cir­cu­lar swings that change color when you move) to clas­sic lawn games, live con­certs and ever-chang­ing over­sized art in­stal­la­tions. No pets. Open daily 7 am-10 pm. 420 D St.

LEGOLAND DIS­COV­ERY CEN­TER

Kids ages 3-10 go ab­so­lutely crazy for this place, and its As­sem­bly Row en­trance marked by a gi­ant yel­low LEGO gi­raffe. Not only can chil­dren build to their hearts’ con­tent they can tum­ble, climb and slide in LEGO City Play Zone or catch a movie at the 4D Cin­ema. Tick­ets: $18.95-$29.95. Open Su-Th 10 am-7 pm, F 10 am-8 pm, Sa 9 am-8 pm. 598 As­sem­bly Row, Somerville, 866.228.6439.

LONG WHARF

Lit­er­ally, Bos­ton’s long­est wharf. In the 18th cen­tury, John Hancock had his of­fices on the dock (which you can visit while din­ing at Chart House restau­rant). To­day, yachts, fer­ries and tour boats weigh an­chor here.

LOUISBURG SQUARE

Bea­con Hill ad­dress that’s been home to some of Bos­ton’s rich­est res­i­dents like Louisa May Al­cott and the Kennedys. Many of the Greek Re­vival row houses re­main sin­gle-fam­ily homes and sur­round a pri­vate, gated green. Be­tween Pinck­ney and Mount Ver­non streets.

MAKE WAY FOR DUCKLINGS STATUE

String of bronze stat­ues in the Pub­lic Gar­den cre­ated by lo­cal artist Nancy Schon. Cel­e­brates the duck­ling fam­ily in Robert McCloskey’s chil­dren’s book “Make Way For Ducklings.” Pub­lic Gar­den.

MAS­SACHUSETTS IN­STI­TUTE OF TECH­NOL­OGY

This pre­em­i­nent bas­tion for higher learn­ing fo­cused on the prac­ti­cal ap­pli­ca­tion of tech­nol­ogy, science and re­search for the 21st cen­tury ex­tends over 168 acres along the Cam­bridge side of the Charles River Basin. The Great Dome of Barker Li­brary is per­haps the school’s most iconic struc­ture, but a pre­mium has al­ways been placed on the en­tirety of the cam­pus’ ar­chi­tec­ture, with sleek and mod­ern build­ings de­signed by the likes of Al­var Aalto, I.M. Pei and Frank Gehry. Vis­i­tor Cen­ter, 77 Mas­sachusetts Ave., Cam­bridge, 617.253.1000.

NEW ENG­LAND AQUAR­IUM

Ex­plore the world’s waters from the Ama­zon rain for­est to the Gulf of Maine. Come see the Gi­ant Ocean Tank, a Caribbean co­ral reef en­vi­ron­ment boast­ing 2,000 sea crea­tures! Ad­mis­sion: $18.95-26.95. Open M-F 9 am-5 pm, Sa-Su 9 am-6 pm. NEAq’s IMAX The­ater screens films daily; tick­ets: $7.95-9.95. 1 Cen­tral Wharf, 617.973.5200.

NEW­BURY STREET

New­bury Street is a hot des­ti­na­tion for shop­pers. Part posh (the lower end of New­bury fea­tures lux­ury brand bou­tiques from Chanel to Valentino) and part hip (the up­per end of New­bury boasts in­de­pen­dently owned

shops and in­ter­na­tional flag­ship stores). New­bury Street at Arlington Street; New­bury Street at Mas­sachusetts Av­enue.

OLD CITY HALL

This deca­dent struc­ture was built 1862-1865 as one of the first build­ings in the French Sec­ond Em­pire ar­chi­tec­tural style in the U.S and is now one of the only ones that sur­vives. This is ac­tu­ally Bos­ton’s third city hall, and it saw the ser­vice of 38 may­ors through 1969, in­clud­ing Josiah Quincy and James M. Cur­ley. 45 School St., 617.523.8678.

OLD SOUTH MEET­ING HOUSE

Built in 1729 as a Puritan meet­ing­house, this site is well known as the place of mass protest gath­er­ings that led to the Bos­ton Tea Party. Fa­mous former con­gre­gants in­clude Samuel Adams and Ben­jamin Franklin. Ad­mis­sion: $1-$6. Open daily 9:30 am-5 pm. 310 Wash­ing­ton St., 617.482.6439.

SOWA

Deep in the South End lives SoWa, a por­tion of the col­or­ful, his­toric Bos­ton neigh­bor­hood that is, quite lit­er­ally, “south” of Wash­ing­ton Street. Its high con­cen­tra­tion of gal­leries, work­ing artist stu­dios and de­sign spa­ces built into re­stored mill build­ings make it a hot spot for creative types search­ing out crafts, con­tem­po­rary and ex­per­i­men­tal art. Fre­quent, reg­u­lar events, like First Fri­days (col­lec­tive open stu­dios on the first Fri­day of each month) and SoWa Sun­days (a gath­er­ing of ope­nair mar­kets, from May through Oc­to­ber) are widely at­tended, and they’re free. 450-500 Har­ri­son Ave.

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