Don’t Miss Tif­fany at the Morse Mu­seum

Where Orlando - - The Guide - For more in­for­ma­tion, call (407) 645-5311 or visit www.morse­mu­seum.org.

WIN­TER PARK, Fla. — Of the many un­ex­pected plea­sures await­ing visi­tors to Cen­tral Florida, none may be as daz­zling as a stroll through the gal­leries of The Charles Hos­mer Morse Mu­seum of Amer­i­can Art, home to the world’s most com­pre­hen­sive col­lec­tion of works by Amer­i­can artist and de­signer Louis Com­fort Tif­fany.

The Tif­fany col­lec­tion at the Morse in­cludes the de­signer’s jew­elry, pot­tery, paint­ings, and art glass, as well as his famed lead­ed­glass lamps and win­dows. High­lights in­clude the re­stored Byzan­tine-Ro­manesque chapel in­te­rior that Tif­fany de­signed for the 1893 World’s Columbian Ex­po­si­tion in Chicago and art and ar­chi­tec­tural ob­jects from his cel­e­brated Long Is­land es­tate, Lau­rel­ton Hall.

The Morse, which cel­e­brates its 75th an­niver­sary this sea­son, was founded by Jean­nette Ge­nius McKean (1909–89) in 1942 and named for her in­dus­tri­al­ist grand­fa­ther. She and her hus­band, Hugh F. McKean (1908–95), the Mu­seum’s di­rec­tor un­til his death, built the col­lec­tion over a 50-year pe­riod. In 1957, when a fire rav­aged Tif­fany’s Lau­rel­ton Hall, the McKeans sal­vaged all they could from the ru­ins for the Morse.

In the Mu­seum’s gal­leries, visi­tors will also find ex­hibits of Amer­i­can art pot­tery, Art Nou­veau ob­jects, and late 19th-and early 20th-cen­tury Amer­i­can paint­ings.

Aurora (Ro­man god­dess of dawn), c. 1894. Leaded glass,

Tif­fany Glass and Dec­o­rat­ing Com­pany.

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