More on sur­veys, science and say what?

Wisconsin Gazette - - Opinion -

MOST TAT­TED COUN­TRY? ITALY

In May, the Ber­lin-based Dalia Re­search firm re­leased a sur­vey on tat­toos con­ducted in 18 coun­tries — Ar­gentina, Aus­tralia, Brazil, Canada, Ger­many, Den­mark, Spain, France, the U.K, Greece, Is­rael, Italy, Mex­ico, Rus­sia, Swe­den, Tur­key, the United States, and South Africa.

The sur­veys showed Italy had the high­est per­cent­age of tat­tooed peo­ple (48 per­cent), fol­lowed by Swe­den (47 per­cent) and the United States (46 per­cent).

The sur­vey also showed:

The high­est rate of tat­toos by age group is 45 per­cent among peo­ple age 30–49.

72 per­cent of tat­too own­ers don’t re­gret tat­toos.

Among tat­tooed peo­ple, about three­fourths have two or more tat­toos.

TEEN TAT­TOOS? HALF OF PAR­ENTS CON­CERNED

About 78 per­cent of par­ents asked how they would re­act if a teenager wanted a tat­too said their an­swer would be “ab­so­lutely not.”

How­ever, an­other one in 10 par­ents thought a tat­too would be OK as a re­ward, to mark a spe­cial oc­ca­sion or if the tat­too could be hid­den, ac­cord­ing to the C.S. Mott Chil­dren’s Hospi­tal Na­tional Poll on Chil­dren’s Health at the Univer­sity of Michi­gan.

Top­ping the list of parental con­cerns about tat­toos? Im­pact on health, so­cial ac­cep­tance and their child’s pro­fes­sional ca­reer.

“As tat­toos be­come in­creas­ingly pop­u­lar across all age groups, more par­ents are nav­i­gat­ing dis­cus­sions about tat­toos with their chil­dren,” said poll co-di­rec­tor and Mott pe­di­a­tri­cian Gary Freed.

BIOENGINEERED TAT­TOO MON­I­TORS BLOOD CAL­CIUM

Sci­en­tists have cre­ated a bio­med­i­cal tat­too that be­comes vis­i­ble on the skin of mice in re­sponse to el­e­vated lev­els of cal­cium in the blood.

The tat­too rep­re­sents an in­no­va­tive di­ag­nos­tic strat­egy that may al­low for ear­lier de­tec­tion of dis­or­ders. Ear­lier de­tec­tion could help di­ag­nose a range of dis­eases, from kid­ney fail­ure to sev­eral forms of can­cer.

BE­ING A TAT­TOO ARTIST CAN BE A PAIN IN THE NECK

The first study to di­rectly mea­sure the phys­i­cal stresses that lead to aches and pains in tat­too artists was con­ducted by re­searchers at Ohio State Univer­sity.

They mea­sured the mus­cle ex­er­tions of 10 cen­tral Ohio tat­too artists at work and found all of them ex­ceeded max­i­mums rec­om­mended to avoid in­jury, es­pe­cially in the mus­cles of their up­per back and neck.

Elec­trodes placed on the artists gath­ered data for 15 sec­onds ev­ery three min­utes for the en­tirety of each tat­too ses­sion.

In ad­di­tion, the re­searchers as­sessed each artist’s pos­ture ev­ery five min­utes and took a pic­ture to doc­u­ment each ob­ser­va­tion.

WHAT MAKES PEO­PLE RE­GRET THEIR TAT­TOOS?

Re­searchers at the United King­dom’s Univer­sity of Portsmouth in part­ner­ship with Casino.org sur­veyed 1,000 peo­ple who said they re­gret­ted their tat­toos.

The sur­vey found that a tat­tooed name is the de­sign most men and women re­gret.

Rea­sons for re­gret­ting a tat­too were var­ied. More than a quar­ter of women and about 24 per­cent of men be­came bored with their tat­toos.

The re­search also found that those who re­gret­ted hav­ing a tat­too were more likely to have spent less time think­ing about the type of tat­too they wanted.

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