The Re­views

WWD Digital Daily - - The Reviews -

Michael Kors

We live in a ca­sual world and lux­ury must ad­just. Ad­van­tage: Michael Kors. While many brands with more lad­i­fied roots must adapt dra­mat­i­cally for women who view yoga pants and sneak­ers as ev­ery­day wardrobe sta­ples, tony sportif has been core to Kors' deign ethos from Day One. That doesn't mean he's built a ca­reer on surf shorts and tanks — only that he has a nat­u­ral affin­ity for dressed-up dress­ing down. From Kors, the in­te­gra­tion of overt ath­letic themes into his sporty aes­thetic feels nat­u­ral, seam­less and, for re­sort, very chic.

“Walk around the Up­per East Side.

You're like, wait a minute, is she per­pet­u­ally ex­er­cis­ing? That's all she does? She only ex­er­cises?” Kors mused dur­ing an ap­point­ment at In­dus­tria Stu­dios. Over­state­ment, per­haps, but the re­al­ity of ca­su­al­iza­tion has made him fo­cus on mul­ti­pur­pose clothes, par­tic­u­larly for this sea­son, in store in time for hol­i­day fetes and va­ca­tions, but also the dol­drums of win­ter. “The clothes have to go to a party, go on va­ca­tion, go to work,” he said, while not­ing that in his case, they must serve many mis­tresses: “We have three gen­er­a­tions of clients.”

Kors' re­sort collection had invit­ing op­tions for all of the above. He em­pha­sized co­or­di­nated looks — of­ten in­clud­ing match­ing-print bags and shoes — which can be eas­ily bro­ken down into items, an ap­proach he finds es­sen­tial to­day. His woman still likes fancy, but ap­proaches it with a to­tal lack of rev­er­ence and a “bro­cade with flip-flops” men­tal­ity. That meant mix-and-match dress­ing such as a pre­ci­sion- cut jacket in ex­quis­ite sil­ver/ aqua bro­cade worn over a lace baby­doll and be­jew­eled sports san­dals, or a sea­far­ing take on a suit — buckle-front scuba vest and skirt in stretch bonded jer­sey. Some looks had what the de­signer called a “mess with your friends” vibe, as in, “I'm wear­ing a shift and a hoodie,” only the shift was in rich, em­broi­dered bro­cade and the hoodie, in cash­mere with dia­mante cords.

Through­out, Kors worked with sharp graphics, whether col­or­blocks or prints, as well as painterly mo­tifs, some­times com­bin­ing the two. While he kept most cuts lin­ear and pre­cise, airy dresses made for touches of boho ro­mance. Yet he kept re­turn­ing to the sporty side. Case in point: a flam­boy­ant track­suit in per­fo­rated plonge leather. “If I can't get them out of ex­er­cise clothes,” Kors quipped, “I'm go­ing to get them into the most op­u­lent ex­er­cise clothes.” — Brid­get Fo­ley

Phi­los­o­phy di Lorenzo Ser­afini

The retro- glam party girl look is work­ing for Lorenzo Ser­afini. Dur­ing his time at Phi­los­o­phy, he's re­vived the throw­back glam­our of the Sev­en­ties, Eight­ies and Nineties with the right mix of nos­tal­gia and moder­nity, so his cus­tomers can touch the at­ti­tude of the time with­out look­ing like they got dressed in a time cap­sule.

For re­sort, Ser­afini took aim at some of the Rolling Stones' wives and girl­friends. Tacked onto his mood board were im­ages of Patti Hansen, Anita Pal­len­berg, Mar­i­anne Faith­full and Bianca Jag­ger. He did well with the ca­sual side of the Sev­en­ties, show­ing a leop­ard-printed vel­vet car coat over a striped knit sweater, flared jeans and san­dals, and a rose­bud wool blazer over a lace top and jeans. There were crisp white eyelet peas­ant blouses and dresses, as well as more dra­matic an­i­mal print dresses cut shorter in front than back. For party sea­son, he broke out the se­quins in fuch­sia and red on tops, shorts and a swingy dress.

“Cruise starts in Novem­ber with more heavy ma­te­ri­als and then we move into De­cem­ber, when it's more for par­ties and soft, and then the last few months, there's light things for peo­ple go­ing to the sea,” said Ser­afini. For the first time there were also things for a younger clien­tele — Phi­los­o­phy is launch­ing a girls' collection, the first round of which were mini-me ver­sions of many of the re­sort looks.

— Jes­sica Iredale

Crea­tures of Com­fort

Crea­tures of Com­fort de­signer Jade

Lai wanted a collection in­spired by her fa­vorite ar­chi­tect Pierre Koenig and his pic­tures of idyl­lic houses and women, but she most def­i­nitely also had her­self in mind as the collection shifted her fall theme of “wom­an­hood” into “moth­er­hood and do­mes­tic­ity” for re­sort. Color-blocked knit pieces in pri­mary shades, denim sep­a­rates, a sim­ple green hoodie with white blazer, loose plaid dresses, and printed pants and dresses in a quirky cream leop­ard print, felt like a non­fussy ap­proach to the kind of wardrobe pieces you'd find in a cool down­town mom's closet — and Lai her­self lives in SoHo.

Fab­rics were a big part of the story with Ja­panese cot­tons, Ital­ian tweeds and wool linen be­ing used as Lai puts it, “be­cause they are durable, easy to wash and care for.” A re­laxed suit look with wide-leg pant, dou­ble-breasted blazer and top used a fab­ric with a bit metal wo­ven in to make it “crunchy” and added a hint of structure. It made for a key look. Lai has also con­tin­ued to build out her ac­ces­sory range with a new laser cut pouch bag and up­date to her fall shoe of­fer­ing with a blue Chelsea boot with block heel added for re­sort. — Thomas Waller

Caro­line Con­stas

“What is she wear­ing to pre­pare for the hol­i­days? What is she pack­ing to spend New Year's in Mex­ico?” Caro­line Con­stas asked her­self when de­sign­ing her lat­est re­sort collection. The de­signer, who nor­mally de­buts a tra­di­tional re­sortwear collection for the sea­son de­cided to in­tro­duce a new, sassy, “hol­i­day take­away” selec­tion of ready-to-wear that mixed well with her fem­i­nine, life­style at­tire. Se­quined looks, like white minidresses paired over match­ing trousers or a blue and white striped set with se­quined top and silk skirt made for su­per-fun new ad­di­tions alongside up­dated flo­ral and leaf-printed easy dresses and blouses. For re­sort, Con­stas took one of her best-sell­ing blouses with bil­lowy sleeves and made it into a full-length gown in a burnt or­ange gi­raffe print. The print was car­ried over into a great knot-front bikini with sleek caf­tan. Whether it was a mul­ti­col­ored se­quin party dress, smocked and ruf­fled day­time dress or a new stretch crepe floor-length blue and white flo­ral dress that could go ei­ther way, her range for re­sort held a fresh, play­ful spirit.

— Emily Mercer

Baja East

Re­sort was the first Baja East lineup done as a solo ef­fort by Scott Stu­den­berg. Five years af­ter he and John Tar­gon launched the collection of uni­sex “loose lux­ury” gear, Tar­gon, who ear­lier this year was briefly hired to work on Marc Ja­cobs' con­tem­po­rary collection, is no longer ac­tively in­volved in the collection. “John is pur­su­ing other creative op­por­tu­ni­ties,” said Stu­den­berg dur­ing a pre­view of re­sort.

Work­ing on his own, Stu­den­berg was free to let his new Los An­ge­les life­style dic­tate the collection's key ref­er­ences. “It's very on Bev­erly Hills in the Nineties,” he said. T- shirts and sweats that of­fered a more fem­i­nine, rather than tough take on street, were printed with funny lines like “Spe­cial Guest Star Heather Lock­lear” and “Right on top of that, Rose” — ref­er­ences to “Mel­rose Place,” and “Don't Tell Mom the Babysit­ter's Dead.” A python printed blazer dress with re­mov­able shoul­der pads, a sil­ver lamé T-shirt and harem pants and over­size satin track­suits re­flected Nineties nos­tal­gia in a more dressed-up way. Stu­den­berg's call­ing it “glam-leisure.”

— Jes­sica Iredale

Khaite

Cather­ine Hol­stein launched Khaite in 2016 as a ve­hi­cle to el­e­vate Amer­i­can sports­wear. The brand of­fers wardrobe essentials rooted in the bal­ance of con­trasts — namely mas­cu­line and fem­i­nine, tai­lored and fluid — to cre­ate a thread of gen­tle strength. In just two years, it's be­come known for great denim, knitwear and tai­lor­ing.

Hol­stein's back­ground is in illustration, but as the de­signer has taken on the role of busi­ness­woman, it's been harder to find time to in­cor­po­rate that artis­tic el­e­ment into the col­lec­tions. So for re­sort, she im­ple­mented artistry through tech­niques that chal­lenged her process, which, in turn, al­lowed sil­hou­ettes to evolve.

The star of the lineup was a pink pleated gown more in­volved than its ap­pear­ance might sug­gest; it fea­tured eight pan­els of asym­met­ric pleat­ing all draped on the model. “It was a la­bor of love,” Hol­stein said in her show­room. “I opened up my mind a lit­tle more. It's a next step for Khaite.” The pleated dress also came in a vel­vet-flocked polka-dot pat­tern and a fiery red version with fly­away threads that chal­lenged shirt­ing fab­ric to be evening-ap­pro­pri­ate. She of­fered sculp­tural el­e­ments else­where in knitwear and through the round­ness of sleeves. “Those small de­tails make all the dif­fer­ence,” she added.

Hol­stein's bal­ance of the hard and soft help the clothes stay away from be­ing too pre­cious. Blaz­ers are min­i­mal yet sharp, jeans are fa­mil­iar but not bor­ing, like a new boot­cut style with the slight­est flare. It's also likely why suit­ing has had 100 per­cent sell-through. Styling could lean just as eas­ily on the side of flirty as it could more se­ri­ous — al­ways with an un­der­cur­rent of mod­est and taste­ful de­sign. — An­drew Shang

Michael Kors

Phi­los­o­phy di Lorenzo Ser­afini

Caro­line Con­stas

Khaite

Baja East

Crea­tures of Com­fort

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.