KALEI­DO­SCOPE

Viet Nam News - - Home Turf - By Phöông Mai

Smart­phone apps popular among Viet­namese house­wives

The

in­creas­ing use of smart­phones in Vieät Nam has led to more mo­bile apps that are help­ing peo­ple save money, eat bet­ter and mon­i­tor their health.

Years ago, Viet­namese house­wives recorded ev­ery­thing on pa­per, and some­times there were in­ac­cu­ra­cies. Now, with only a smart­phone, mo­bile apps on per­sonal money man­age­ment help record and store house­hold ex­penses in a more pre­cise way.

On­line mo­bile apps at the Ap­ple and Google Play stores, for ex­am­ple, in­clude Money Lover, Soå Thu Chi (Spend­ing Note­book) and T2Ex­pense.

Phan Kim Quyeân, a mother of two sons in Bieân Hoøa City, said: "I'm us­ing Soå Thu Chi, and I'm pleased with what it of­fers be­cause it helps me man­age my fam­ily's ex­penses."

"That's what I ex­pect from a smart­phone," she said.

Used cloth­ing gets sec­ond life in tough eco­nomic times

How

dare a white-col­lar em­ployee wear a sec­ond­hand piece of cloth­ing, you say? In Vieät Nam, where ev­ery­thing new is ven­er­ated by poseurs who see them­selves as "mod­ern" fash­ion plates, the idea of pur­chas­ing sec­ond­hand cloth­ing is of­ten viewed with hor­ror and dis­dain.

In many other coun­tries, even those far more de­vel­oped, sec­ond­hand goods, par­tic­u­larly high- qual­ity vin­tage items, are sought after by those who have an ap­pre­ci­a­tion and love for good de­sign, both old and new.

How­ever, a new trend seems to be emerg­ing in the coun­try for sec­ond­hand clothes that are priced and made well.

"Pre­vi­ously, my cus­tomers were mostly stu­dents, but now more and more of­fice staff are com­ing," says Nguyeãn Vaên Quoác, an owner of a sec­ond­hand cloth­ing shop in HCM City's Baø Chieåàu Mar­ket.

Quoác says many of his prod­ucts were from the US or the UK, with popular brand names like Old Navy, H&M and Mango that at­tract stu­dents and oth­ers look­ing for de­cent qual­ity at a rel­a­tively low price.

Traàn Thò Thaûnh, who bought five shirts for her hus­band from a shop in Dis­trict 3, said some of the clothes were big enough to fit her hus­band.

"I am sat­is­fied with the fab­ric and de­signs which have nice, in­ter­est­ing pat­terns," she said.

It ap­pears that the ris­ing prices of ready­made clothes, rather than an ap­pre­ci­a­tion for a va­ri­ety of styles and vin­tages, have re­newed in­ter­est and de­sire in sec­ond­hand cloth­ing in the coun­try. A new lo­cally-made shirt now costs be­tween VNÑ250,000 (US$12) to 500,000 ($24) and beyond.

"The shirt I bought was only VNÑ100,000, but it can look good for a few years," Thaûnh said.

"I look at the brand names, colour and ma­te­ri­als," Thaûnh says."It takes a lot of time to find nice used cloth­ing, but you can get good items at very rea­son­able prices."

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