MAS­TER YOUR KEYSHOT REN­DERS

Dis­cover how to im­prove your ren­der ex­pe­ri­ence with our 30 ex­pert tips

3D World - - TUTORIALS - author Maya Jermy Maya is a 3D artist and an­i­ma­tor based in the UK. She started her ca­reer in 2012 re­mak­ing and an­i­mat­ing char­ac­ters for Od­dworld: Abe’s Od­dysee – New ‘n’ Tasty. art­sta­tion.com/ maya­jermy

ren­der­ing an im­age, an­i­ma­tion of a model or even a whole scene is an im­por­tant step in art cre­ation, and by not tak­ing your work through this process the end re­sult will look un­fin­ished. Even if you are aim­ing for a rus­tic style, it looks bet­ter when it is ac­tu­ally ren­dered that way. Whether it is just for a port­fo­lio or com­mer­cial pur­poses, be­ing able to ren­der your work is a valu­able ex­per­tise.

Ev­ery artist has a favourite ren­der en­gine to work with. Keyshot of­fers a wide range of tools and sim­ple ren­der­ing so­lu­tions, en­abling the user to have a beau­ti­ful and seam­less cre­ative ex­pe­ri­ence. The eas­ier the work­flow, the bet­ter and quicker the re­sults. Know­ing your way around the soft­ware al­lows you to con­cen­trate on the cre­ative side of the process.

It might ini­tially seem a lit­tle dif­fi­cult to get to grips with for begin­ners, no mat­ter how straight­for­ward the soft­ware may be. At the be­gin­ning of my 3D ca­reer I kept won­der­ing: Am I do­ing it wrong? What if it does not look good to oth­ers? How do I make things look in­ter­est­ing or at­trac­tive to the eye? It is only fair to ad­mit that even with a few years of ex­pe­ri­ence un­der my belt, I still ask my­self those ques­tions. It can take a long time to re­alise that you are be­ing too harsh on your­self and your work.

To re­duce that self doubt and the stress that comes with it, the best thing to do is to fa­mil­iarise your­self with the soft­ware. Be patient. Get used to it. Learn what it can do to help you through the jour­ney, and fi­nally, ex­per­i­ment! It is very easy to get frus­trated if you do not give your­self the time to ex­plore the op­tions, and in­stead try to learn on the job.

It may seem like there is a lot to learn about for this par­tic­u­lar soft­ware, but that is not the case at all. Here I have pro­vided some tips to help guide you through it; be aware that some of these steps are ex­clu­sive and based on the new­est ver­sion of the soft­ware, Keyshot 8 Pro, and are not avail­able in Keyshot 7 or older.

01 TRY KEYSHOT CLOUD

This is an on­line li­brary of ma­te­ri­als, en­vi­ron­ments, tex­tures and back­plates – there is a great va­ri­ety of re­sources to choose from. You can also up­load your own ma­te­ri­als to share with other Keyshot users. Great com­mu­nity ef­fort. Maya Jermy

02 CHOOSE A UI THEME

A quick process that can greatly as­sist with your learn­ing is set­ting up your own in­ter­face lay­out. Putting rel­e­vant menus and tabs in strate­gic places can speed up your work­flow and learn­ing process. When you know where to find the things you need, you will feel more fa­mil­iar with the soft­ware. Keyshot of­fers two colour themes: light and dark. To change the theme at any time go to Edit> Pref­er­ences>in­ter­face, or se­lect it from the Workspaces Startup rib­bon drop­down. Maya Jermy

03 USE PER­FOR­MANCE MODE

Once you’ve added a lot of lights to your project and the scene be­comes ‘heavy’, nav­i­ga­tion per­for­mance will drop. Mov­ing around the scene be­comes dif­fi­cult and laggy. The best so­lu­tion is to ac­ti­vate Per­for­mance Mode. It will re­move cer­tain light set­tings (global il­lu­mi­na­tion, ground shad­ows) from the ac­tive ren­der and re­duce the CPU us­age pres­sure. You can also find it in Project>light­ing>light­ing Pre­sets. Maya Jermy

04 LINK MA­TE­RI­ALS

If you have a ma­te­rial you want to ap­ply to mul­ti­ple ob­jects, there are a few things that can be done. First, you can save out the ma­te­rial to your li­brary, then ap­ply it to the se­lec­tion of ob­jects. Op­tion two is to ma­te­rial link the ob­jects so all re­ceive the up­dated changes. To do this, se­lect two or more items and press Link Ma­te­ri­als. Al­ter­na­tively, right-click on the se­lected ob­jects and from the pop-up menu se­lect Ma­te­rial> Link Ma­te­ri­als. Maya Jermy

05 AP­PLY MA­TE­RI­ALS TO LA­BELS

La­bels do not need to be plas­tic and bor­ing. Once ap­plied to a

model, la­bels can take on any ma­te­rial, bump or opac­ity de­sired. It is lit­er­ally as sim­ple as drag and drop. To add a lit­tle wear and tear to a la­bel, just find the right tex­ture map and drop it in the Bump slot of the La­bels tab. Se­lect a pro­ce­dural map from the drop-down menu, for ex­am­ple, noise. If you want to ap­ply the same tex­ture as the par­ent ob­ject’s, se­lect the From Par­ent op­tion. Al­ter­na­tively, nav­i­gate to the par­ent Tex­ture tab, se­lect the Bump tile and tick Ap­ply Bump To La­bels lo­cated be­low. It will project the same map on all la­bels ap­plied. Maya Jermy

06 CRE­ATE DEPTH OF FIELD

Tired of adding depth of field in post-pro­duc­tion, fak­ing it in Pho­to­shop? Try adding it to your ac­tive win­dow and see the re­sults be­fore hit­ting the Ren­der but­ton. Depth of Field sits com­fort­ably in the Cam­era tab, where it can be eas­ily ac­ti­vated and ma­nip­u­lated with just a few slid­ers. You can also set the cam­era fo­cus by click­ing on the part of the model you want to drive at­ten­tion to. Keyshot will ap­ply the set amount of blur based on your cho­sen fo­cus and dis­tance. Maya Jermy

07 RE­GION REN­DER­ING

This is es­pe­cially use­ful when work­ing on a big project, in Per­for­mance mode – there’s no need to ren­der the en­tire thing just to see how a lit­tle piece will look ren­dered. Open the Ren­der menu and choose the re­gion you want to ren­der. This will save you some se­ri­ous time, and pre­vent your ma­chine from over­heat­ing in the process. Maya Jermy

08 REN­DER GLOSS PASS

Keyshot does de­cent ren­der passes based on the ma­te­ri­als and lights used in the scene, but some­times it is not enough and it would be use­ful to have ad­di­tional ren­ders of just clean spec­u­lar and gloss. The best so­lu­tion is to change the en­vi­ron­ment to plain black, and ap­ply glossy black ma­te­rial to the model. In the ma­te­rial editor ad­just re­flec­tions and rough­ness (gloss), then use a pin light to cap­ture the right look. Maya Jermy

HONEY BEAR Keyshot has built a fan­tas­tic rep­u­ta­tion for prod­uct ren­ders

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