3D World

The fu­ture is Foundry

Foundry dis­cuss what’s next for their pi­o­neer­ing soft­ware

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Foundry, the lead­ing de­vel­oper of cre­ative soft­ware for the en­ter­tain­ment and dig­i­tal de­sign in­dus­tries, made a splash re­cently with a raft of an­nounce­ments at the sum­mer edi­tion of Foundry Live – their big­gest on­line event of the year, which took place be­tween 16-23 July 2020.

Af­ter the event 3D World spoke to Christy Anzelmo, Foundry’s di­rec­tor of prod­uct – com­posit­ing and fin­ish­ing; Jor­dan Thistle­wood, di­rec­tor of prod­uct – pre­pro­duc­tion, lookdev and light­ing; and Rory Wood­ford, Mari prod­uct manager to get a roundup of why you should be ex­cited for what’s to come from the de­vel­oper.

NUKE IN­DIE

Among the big an­nounce­ments was the re­veal of Nuke In­die, an ac­ces­si­ble ver­sion of Nuke Stu­dio for el­i­gi­ble solo artists. “Nuke In­die in­cludes the in­dus­try-lead­ing node­based com­posit­ing toolset of Nukex and the con­form, ed­i­to­rial and re­view ca­pa­bil­i­ties of Nuke Stu­dio with a few func­tional lim­i­ta­tions, mak­ing it the ul­ti­mate tool for solo artists want­ing to cre­ate high-qual­ity vis­ual ef­fects, at an ac­ces­si­ble price of $499, £399, or $449 per year, ” says Anzelmo.

“Our goal with Nuke In­die is to strengthen Nuke’s user base and up­lift artist skills across the VFX in­dus­try,” she con­tin­ues. “We un­der­stand the need to make Nuke more ac­ces­si­ble for solo artists look­ing to use the in­dus­try-lead­ing com­posit­ing toolset on pro­fes­sional projects.” Nuke In­die launches within the lat­est re­lease of the Nuke fam­ily, Nuke 12.2, and is avail­able for pur­chase as an an­nual sub­scrip­tion.

NUKE 12.2

The lat­est re­lease for Nuke builds on the themes of the prior Nuke 12 re­leases, with an em­pha­sis on stream­lin­ing data flow into comp and ex­tend­ing re­view work­flows in Nuke Stu­dio and Hiero. “Nuke 12.2 fa­cil­i­tates flex­i­bil­ity and col­lab­o­ra­tion for teams work­ing re­motely and ex­pands data types supported in Nuke, while of­fer­ing a ro­bust and stream­lined ex­pe­ri­ence when work­ing with Quick­time,” adds Anzelmo.

“Some high­lights of Nuke 12.2 in­clude: sup­port for read­ing in geom­e­try from USD data us­ing Nuke’s Read­geo node; Syn­creview which al­lows mul­ti­ple users to run col­lab­o­ra­tive re­view ses­sions in Nuke Stu­dio, Hiero or Hiero­player; and the in­tro­duc­tion of RLM li­cence roaming to al­low users to ‘check out’ float­ing li­cences for use off­line for up to 30 days.”

KATANA 4.0

The cul­mi­na­tion of four years’ hard work, Katana 4.0 ar­rives with a host of up­dates and im­prove­ments for Foundry’s light­ing and look de­vel­op­ment toolset. Not only will there be sup­port for all ren­der­ing plug­ins, but sev­eral viewer im­prove­ments, in­clud­ing the abil­ity for users to in­ter­act di­rectly with the scene through ren­dered images.

Katana 4.0’s new artist-friendly light­ing mode will present users with work­flows that are mod­elled on tra­di­tional cin­e­matog­ra­phy pro­cesses. “Due to be re­leased in Oc­to­ber, Katana 4.0 is a game-changer in light­ing and look de­vel­op­ment,” ex­plains Thistle­wood. “We are de­liv­er­ing a fu­ture that will al­low

“KATANA 4.0 IS A GAME-CHANGER IN LIGHT­ING AND LOOK DE­VEL­OP­MENT” Jor­dan Thistle­wood, di­rec­tor of prod­uct – pre-pro­duc­tion, lookdev and light­ing

artists to think like cin­e­matog­ra­phers, with a UI that al­lows an artist to light the way they think. Gone are the days that an artist works with awk­ward 3D han­dles to ma­nip­u­late lights through a process of trial and er­ror. New fea­tures like a cut­tingedge Light­ing Mode, new Katana Fore­sight work­flows (mul­ti­ple si­mul­ta­ne­ous ren­ders along with in­ter­ac­tive net­work ren­der­ing) and up­dated USD tech­nol­ogy con­trib­ute to a turbo-charged artist work­flow.”

MARI

Foundry Live also saw the an­nounce­ment of up­dates to 3D tex­ture paint­ing soft­ware, Mari. “The next ver­sions of Mari, 4.7 & 5.0 (sup­port­ing VFX Ref­er­ence Plat­form 2020 in­clud­ing Python 3), are due to be re­leased in De­cem­ber,” ex­plains Wood­ford. “Both will of­fer a re­designed shelf for man­ag­ing artists’ li­brary of ma­te­ri­als, brushes, images and cus­tom pro­ce­du­rals.”

He con­tin­ues: “The new cus­tom pro­ce­du­rals will al­low artists to cre­ate their own pro­ce­dural lay­ers and masks that pack­age all ref­er­ence images into a sin­gle file for easy shar­ing across teams. They can also lever­age Geo-chan­nel data to make masks con­form to an ob­ject’s shape and form to bring more re­al­ism when lay­er­ing ma­te­ri­als. Be­yond 2020, our fu­ture goals are to em­power Mari artists work­ing in a USD pipe­line and en­able faster work­flows via USD be­tween Mari and Katana.”

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 ??  ?? Above: All of the in­sights, sneak peeks and ex­cit­ing prod­uct de­vel­op­ments from Foundry Live 2020 can be viewed on-de­mand at foundry.com
Above: All of the in­sights, sneak peeks and ex­cit­ing prod­uct de­vel­op­ments from Foundry Live 2020 can be viewed on-de­mand at foundry.com
 ??  ?? Left: A glimpse of Nuke 12.2’s Sync Re­view fea­ture, which al­lows teams work­ing re­motely to ef­fec­tively col­lab­o­rate on projects
Left: A glimpse of Nuke 12.2’s Sync Re­view fea­ture, which al­lows teams work­ing re­motely to ef­fec­tively col­lab­o­rate on projects
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