3D World

The Gallery

I DEVEL­OPED SCRIPTS THAT AL­LOWED ME TO SEP­A­RATE EACH PIECE OF GE­OM­E­TRY FROM THE MAIN HAIR OB­JECT

- ● in­sta­gram.com/ema­teo3d ● in­sta­gram.com/troitiarts

Dis­cover the best dig­i­tal art from the CG com­mu­nity

ARTISTS

Eva Ma­teo, Jaime L. Troiti

SOFT­WARE

Zbrush, Sub­stance Painter, Maya, Xgen, Arnold, Nuke

This fan­tas­tic im­age was cre­ated by ju­nior light­ing and shad­ing artist, Eva Ma­teo, and free­lance 3D char­ac­ter mod­eller, Jaime L. Troiti, as a trib­ute to 1998 crime-comedy film, The Big Le­bowski. The process be­gan with two weeks of pre-pro­duc­tion. “The char­ac­ters were mod­elled with­out any de­sign in mind,” ex­plains Ma­teo, “so I kind of fig­ured them out on the go.” Shad­ing, groom­ing, and look devel­op­ment took a fur­ther two weeks, with three days for light­ing and a fi­nal day of com­posit­ing.

While cre­at­ing the hair, the duo be­gan the long and com­pli­cated process of con­vert­ing the polyg­o­nal hair to curves that they could use later in Xgen. “I de­vel­oped a cou­ple of scripts that al­lowed me to sep­a­rate each piece of ge­om­e­try from the main hair ob­ject, and cre­ate a curve for each one of them,” says Ma­teo. “This way a process that would have taken me around eight hours was al­most au­to­matic.”

For Troiti, the most en­joy­able part of the process came at the very be­gin­ning. “I can be more cre­ative and play with shapes and com­po­si­tion pretty freely,” he adds. Con­trar­ily, Ma­teo found the fi­nal steps of com­posit­ing in Nuke to be the most fun. She con­tin­ues: “I cre­ated a tem­plate that I ad­justed for the fi­nal de­tails with AOV light groups or ma­te­ri­als like Dif­fuse, Spec­u­lar, Trans­mis­sion or SSS af­ter I added the cam­era ef­fects like chro­matic aber­ra­tion, lens dis­tor­tion, glow, vi­gnette and colour grad­ing.”

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