3D World

The Gallery

- kev­in­harg­er­art.com

Dis­cover the best dig­i­tal art from the CG com­mu­nity

BOXCUTTER IS A PLU­GIN I’VE FOUND VERY HELP­FUL FOR GET­TING IN­TER­EST­ING BLOCKOUTS QUICKLY

ARTIST

Kevin Harger

SOFT­WARE

Blender, Pho­to­shop

This dy­namic scene took Kevin Harger, Lex & Otis An­i­ma­tion vis­ual devel­op­ment artist, 12 hours to com­plete. Harger be­gan learn­ing 3D in Maya sev­eral years ago, be­fore tak­ing a break and get­ting back into the swing of things with Modo. Now, af­ter an­other long hia­tus, he’s hav­ing a blast get­ting to grips with Blender.

Harger’s cre­ative process be­gan with sev­eral thumb­nails, which helped him nail down the con­cept of a myth­i­cal gi­ant breach­ing the walls of Troy, as well as the com­po­si­tion of the im­age it­self. “I mostly use 3D in a fairly sim­pli­fied way,” he tells 3D World, “it helps a lot with block­ing out an ar­chi­tec­tural space to give it a real sense of depth. Boxcutter is a plu­gin I’ve found very help­ful for get­ting in­ter­est­ing blockouts quickly.”

The light­ing is of­ten the start­ing point for Harger’s cre­ations, “Cy­cles gives you some pretty stel­lar global il­lu­mi­na­tion,” he adds. “A great piece of ad­vice I got re­cently was to ei­ther take your piece to 70 per cent fin­ished in 3D, and 30 per cent in Pho­to­shop, or vice versa. This helps you to know when to move to the next step and fin­ish up the paint­ing.” Harger is far more com­fort­able paint­ing than work­ing in 3D, hence for this im­age he spent two or three hours on a rough model and light­ing setup, then eight to ten hours in Pho­to­shop.

“This piece was a real strug­gle for me,” Harger ad­mits, “I was go­ing through some dif­fi­cult stuff in my per­sonal life. I’m glad I pushed through and got a cool prod­uct out of it though.”

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