3D World

De­sign and ren­der a mod­ern in­te­rior

Learn to use key as­sets, tools and tech­niques to cre­ate stun­ning re­sults for your in­te­rior ren­der projects

- Adobe Photoshop · 3D Studio Max · Texture

Aref Razavi demon­strates how to cre­ate an at­trac­tive CG in­te­rior

Be­fore we can be­gin cre­at­ing in­te­rior ren­ders such as this, it’s very im­por­tant that we first take a look at real-world in­spi­ra­tion. I used de­cou­vrir­len­droit­dudecor.blogspot.com for ref­er­ences, it’s a great blog with a lovely col­lec­tion of beau­ti­ful in­te­ri­ors.

Af­ter you’ve cho­sen a great ref­er­ence, first draw the plan of your project. Im­port into 3ds Max and start mod­el­ling. Here I’ve used Mar­velous De­signer to cre­ate the bed and cur­tain. Some as­sets are mod­elled in 3ds Max and oth­ers come from 3dsky and Ever­mo­tion. This work was quite unique in that 90 per cent of shaders were cre­ated with Sub­stance Pain­ter, which was quite a chal­lenge!

I also made use of Rizom-lab, which I’d ar­gue is one of the best pieces of soft­ware for UV un­wrap­ping, plus it’s very sim­ple to use and has a clear work­flow.

Ma­te­ri­als were built us­ing Sub­stance De­signer. But why? Let’s imag­ine a din­ing ta­ble as an ex­am­ple. It has ten shaders with many pa­ram­e­ters and ev­ery shader has some tex­tures. When we want to cre­ate a ren­der from this din­ing ta­ble, 3ds Max will present many ma­te­ri­als and tex­tures, whereas with Sub­stance it takes just one.

Af­ter we’ve fin­ished this process we must choose the right at­mos­phere for the ren­der. In this case I have opted for a cloudy day, with ad­di­tional ex­ter­nal de­tails that re­ally make the dif­fer­ence in lev­els of be­liev­abil­ity and real­ism. Model li­braries such as those from Kit­bash3d are per­fect.

01 DRAW AND MODEL

First, draw the plan in AU­TOCAD – it’s very easy to use and pro­duces ac­cu­rate re­sults. Af­ter that im­port into 3ds Max and start mod­el­ling, fol­low­ing your plan. Just be careful, all ver­tices must be closed, and don’t use Tur­bosmooth. To cre­ate a floor, I would highly rec­om­mend the Floor Gen­er­a­tor plugin.

02 MOLD­INGS

First we need to draw all edges and cor­ners; we can use the Sweep Pro­file script or draw a cus­tom 2D shape. Af­ter that, we must use Sweep Mod­ify to cre­ate mold­ing. Don’t use a com­plex path. If you want per­fect mold­ing you need to split ob­jects into sep­a­rate pieces.

03 MAR­VELOUS DE­SIGNER

To make blan­kets and pil­lows we use Mar­velous De­signer. It's the best soft­ware for sim­u­lat­ing clothes, blan­kets, pil­lows and cur­tains. In the archviz in­dus­try, we need to use a sim­ple, pow­er­ful and speedy pro­gram, and MD is ideal for this. Af­ter im­port­ing from Mar­velous to 3ds Max, use UVW Xform when set­ting tex­ture size.

04 RIZOM-LAB

Un­wrap­ping is al­ways one of the hard­est steps in tex­tur­ing, but us­ing Rizom-lab can speed

up the process like a mir­a­cle. There is a very use­ful bridge – you can trans­fer the 3D model from 3ds Max to Rizom-lab with just one click.

05 UNWRAP, MOD­IFY AND IM­PORT

You can al­ways unwrap in 3ds Max, but it’s not very pow­er­ful. For a sim­ple shape like this though, it can be use­ful; just click Flat­ten and done!

For trans­fer­ring mod­els from 3ds Max to Sub­stance Pain­ter we can use an of­fi­cial bridge, which you can down­load from sub­stance3d.com. You must make sure your model has the cor­rect unwrap. When im­port­ing the model we must Bake Mesh Maps from the Tex­ture Set List. Af­ter that’s fin­ished we can start our work in Sub­stance Pain­ter.

06 WET MA­TE­RI­ALS

Al­ways use wet shaders! Just be careful not to use too many, and to use the right mois­ture. Not too much and not too lit­tle. In Sub­stance Pain­ter we can make use of the very handy Par­ti­cle brush.

07 DIRTY MIR­ROR

Mir­rors, glasses, chromes… they need specks of dirt. Like fin­ger­prints, steam, rain, marks in the cor­ners; as al­ways, look in the real world. For ex­am­ple, look at the near­est win­dow, or your phone screen… 100 per cent clean? Of course not. Your in­te­rior ren­der should be rem­i­nis­cent of the real world.

08 WET FLOOR

Hav­ing a wet floor al­ways adds a nice touch, and im­proves real­ism. When we can see a small re­flec­tion of the room on the floor, it cre­ates a larger space for us, and tells the viewer that the oc­cu­pants care about clean­li­ness.

09 RAIN ON WIN­DOWS

Rain is al­ways a sym­bol of beauty and fresh­ness, so let’s try to cap­ture the feel­ing of a beau­ti­ful rainy day. Note that when it rains on the win­dow, the rain­drops should be on the out­side of the win­dow and the

in­side of the win­dow should be slightly steamed.

10 EDI­SON LAMP

Edi­son lamps have a lot of de­tails and are al­ways at­trac­tive, but it can be a big chal­lenge to ma­te­ri­alise it. You should be able to cre­ate re­flec­tion and re­frac­tion to­gether in one tex­ture set in Sub­stance Pain­ter. This re­quires a bit of prac­tice and rep­e­ti­tion. The ID tex­ture is very im­por­tant for this method.

11 MA­TE­RIAL LOADER

I find this script re­ally use­ful – gum­road.com/l/xoph. It's only $20 and cre­ates PBR shades from PBR tex­ture (like ex­port­ing tex­ture sets from Sub­stance Pain­ter).

12 LIGHT­ING

For in­te­rior scenes, we must cre­ate a plane light for all win­dows. This work­flow gives us di­rect lights, mean­ing that the viewer can de­tect where your stage light comes from. Please don’t use fake light!

13 SET CAM­ERA

Cam­era work is an art in it­self, but aim for sim­ple an­gles, at hu­man head height, then add close-up ren­ders for de­tails – and don’t for­get depth of field.

14 REN­DER SETUP

Corona Ren­derer is a great ren­der en­gine, and in this case I didn’t even need to change any of the de­fault ren­der set­tings. Just set the noise level as re­quired

– a set­ting of 5 with de­noise in enough for most cases. If you have a heavy amount of noise, there are so­lu­tions; for ex­am­ple, use a small 1K HDRI file. Set a sky por­tal or plane light be­hind all win­dows, use Corona Sun for sunny days, and turn off caus­tics.

15 POST-PRO­DUC­TION

The best tools for post­pro­duc­tion in Corona Ren­derer are Light­mix and Corona Frame Buf­fer. Af­ter you’ve fin­ished, you can save it as a 32-bit EXR file and open it in Pho­to­shop to cor­rect the fi­nal de­tails. •

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