JAILED FOR CHILD PORN

Albany Advertiser - - FRONT PAGE - Michael Traill

An Al­bany man will spend at least nine months in prison for pos­sess­ing more than 20,000 ex­am­ples of child ex­ploita­tion ma­te­rial.

In his sen­tenc­ing re­marks at Al­bany Dis­trict Court on Tues­day, Judge Christo­pher Steven­son said the crimes com­mit­ted by 51-year-old David John So­bik were not vic­tim­less.

“Those who are pre­pared to pos­sess or im­port it help fuel the de­mand for it,” Judge Steven­son said.

A 51-year-old McKail man has been sen­tenced to 18 months in prison for pos­sess­ing more than 20,000 ex­am­ples of child ex­ploita­tion ma­te­rial.

David John So­bik will be el­i­gi­ble for pa­role af­ter nine months be­hind bars, af­ter po­lice found 20,617 im­ages and 178 videos of child ex­ploita­tion ma­te­rial on his lap­top and hard drive while ex­e­cut­ing a search war­rant on May 22.

Five of the im­ages were classed as cat­e­gory five pieces of child ex­ploita­tion ma­te­rial, which can in­clude de­pic­tions of chil­dren in­volv­ing sadism and bes­tial­ity.

On April 13, WA Po­lice re­ceived in­for­ma­tion from the US-based In­ter­net Crimes Against Chil­dren Task Force that a WA IP ad­dress was ac­cess­ing child ex­ploita­tion ma­te­rial, which led to po­lice ex­e­cut­ing the search war­rant on So­bik’s home.

Dur­ing his sen­tenc­ing hear­ing at Al­bany Dis­trict Court on Tues­day, Judge Christo­pher Steven­son said So­bik’s crimes were not vic­tim­less.

“Such of­fences are not vic­tim­less crimes,” Judge Steven­son said.

“Those are who are pre­pared to pos­sess or im­port it help fuel the de­mand for it, and in that way en­cour­age the cor­rup­tion and ex­ploita­tion of chil­dren.

“Any right-think­ing per­son who viewed the ma­te­rial that was in your pos­ses­sion would have dis­tanced them­selves and not stored it on a hard disk and would have at­tempted to delete and cer­tainly not con­tin­ued to down­load that type of ma­te­rial.”

Richard Hickson, So­bik’s de­fence lawyer, claimed his client never in­tended to down­load the more ob­scene files found on the lap­top and hard drive.

“The in­ten­tion was to down­load cat­e­gory one ma­te­rial . . . There was no in­ten­tion, ob­vi­ously, to trans­mit or pro­duce or any of the other type of of­fend­ing of this cat­e­gory,” Mr Hickson said.

“To use a fish­ing ter­mi­nol­ogy, the other ma­te­rial is ef­fec­tively by-catch, but it’s ad­mit­ted to be­ing there.

“He can’t deny that it wasn’t there . . . He just didn’t go look­ing for it.”

Judge Steven­son re­jected the claim.

He said his sen­tence had to act as a de­ter­rence and re­flect the se­ri­ous­ness of So­bik’s crimes.

“The court must im­pose a sen­tence . . . which is com­men­su­rate with the se­ri­ous­ness of the of­fence, which must be de­ter­mined by tak­ing into ac­count the statu­tory penalty for the of­fence, the cir­cum­stances of the com­mis­sion of the of­fence — in­clud­ing the vul­ner­a­bil­ity of the vic­tims, and there are many, many vic­tims through­out the world de­picted in this ma­te­rial,” Judge Steven­son said.

“It is, and con­tains, a high de­gree of perver­sion and de­bauch­ery.

“As al­ready men­tioned, you can see the chil­dren re­spond­ing to in­struc­tions given to them by oth­ers off-camera telling them what to do and how to do it.”

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