EX­PE­RI­ENCE WOODC ARV I N G

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Asian Geographic - - Front Page -

Wood­carv­ing Thai wood­carv­ing, called Kru­ang Mai Cham Lak, is con­sid­ered one of the coun­try’s tra­di­tional art forms. Done in an an­cient artis­tic style, carv­ings are di­vided into three types: bas-re­lief, deep-re­lief and round-re­lief. Bas-re­lief has flat carv­ings only on the front of the wood, with few curves. Deep-re­lief carv­ings have three di­men­sions: depth, width, and height. Ex­am­ples of round-re­lief carv­ings in­clude Bud­dha sculp­tures, which have been carved on ev­ery side. Since wood de­cays eas­ily com­pared to ce­ment or brick, Thai wood art is very rare, and a work can take years to com­plete, re­quir­ing high lev­els of pa­tience and artis­tic skill by the carver. To­day, skilled crafts­men are rarely found, and few are will­ing to be­come dis­ci­ples.

Thai wood art is very rare, and a work can take years to com­plete, re­quir­ing high lev­els of pa­tience WHEN WHERE

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