1,000 KILO­GRAMMES

Wild yaks are one of the big­gest bovids and can weigh up to 1000kg. Yaks don’t moo like cows but in­stead grunt.

Asian Geographic - - Front Page - AN­I­MAL

power on the bat­tle­field. One no­table tsenpo is Song­sten Gampo who as­cended the throne when China was uni­fied un­der the Tang dy­nasty. After cen­turies of tu­mult, the city of Chang’an (mod­ern day Xi’an) was once again the beat­ing heart of a thriv­ing em­pire, a cos­mopoli­tan cap­i­tal in­formed with all man­ner of Silk Road ex­oti­cism in­clud­ing Turk­ish dress and tem­ples rever­ing the In­dian sage Sid­dhartha Gau­tama, known to the West as Bud­dha.

The se­cond Tang em­peror Taizong had lit­tle knowl­edge or re­spect for the emerg­ing Ti­betan em­pire and twice dis­al­lowed a Chi­nese princess and the “bar­bar­ian” Song­sten to wed. He changed his mind after bloody skir­mishes on the Chi­nese fron­tier in 638 AD con­vinced him of the need for a mar­riage al­liance. In 640 AD, his niece, Princess Wencheng, was granted to Song­sten Gampo in a union that is com­mem­o­rated in Yushu to this day. Ti­betans credit her for in­tro­duc­ing Bud­dhism to Ti­bet. She brought a Bud­dha statue to Ti­bet, and it’s still housed in Lhasa’s Jokang Monastery. She is con­sid­ered by the Ti­betans to be a phys­i­cal man­i­fes­ta­tion of the bod­hisattva Tara and as holy as Mother Mary is to Catholics.

20 kilo­me­tres south of Yushu Town, Princess Wencheng Tem­ple was built to hon­our her in the Princess Wencheng Scenic Area — a val­ley pass be­lieved to be the route the princess took while en route to Lhasa — is dec­o­rated with more prayer flags than one might imag­ine pos­si­ble. A man­darin-speak­ing lama in the Wencheng Tem­ple ex­plained that when Song­sten Gampo trav­elled to Lhasa with Princess Wencheng, they stopped here for a month and taught the lo­cals any things. The foot­prints she left on a rock there quickly be­came an ob­ject of wor­ship, and it was an­other Chi­nese princess named Jincheng, who also passed through the Leba Ravine, who built this tem­ple built to hon­our Princess Wencheng.

She is con­sid­ered by the Ti­betans to be a phys­i­cal man­i­fes­ta­tion of the bod­hisattva Tara and as holy as Mother Mary is to Catholics.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.