Best of Na­ture

Asian Geographic - - CONTENTS -

Home to most of the fastest-de­vel­op­ing economies in the world, Asia has seen its wildlife dec­i­mated by the re­lent­less march of progress and ur­ban­i­sa­tion. Ten years ago, we pub­lished a list of some of the most en­dan­gered an­i­mals in Asia. Un­for­tu­nately, the plight of all of the an­i­mals on that list has only wors­ened

Home to most of the fastest-de­vel­op­ing economies in the world, Asia has seen its wildlife dec­i­mated by the re­lent­less march of progress and ur­ban­i­sa­tion. Ten years ago, we pub­lished a list of some of the most en­dan­gered an­i­mals in Asia. Un­for­tu­nately, the plight of all of the an­i­mals on that list has only wors­ened

Re­vis­ited

No.85 Is­sue 8/2011

Ti­tle

WWF Pri­or­ity Species! Rhinoceros

Pho­tos

Getty Images/Brand X

Rhinoceros

Rhi­nos once roamed through­out Eura­sia and Africa, and were known to early Euro­peans who de­picted them in cave paint­ings. Within his­tor­i­cal times, they were still wide­spread across Africa’s sa­van­nas and Asia’s trop­i­cal forests. But today, very few rhi­nos sur­vive out­side na­tional parks and re­serves.

WWF PRI­OR­ITY SPECIES|RHINOCEROS 48 | Il­le­gal trade in rhino horn is a con­tin­u­ing prob­lem, pos­ing one of the great­est threats to rhi­nos today

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