Asian Geographic

Gold

AROUND 4,000 BCE

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First discovered in the ancient world in its most basic and natural state in streams and in the ground, gold became mankind’s first precious metal. Civilisati­ons used it in the making of jewellery and other artefacts due to its brilliance and resistance to tarnishing. The rarity and beauty of gold quickly made it the symbol of royalty and glamour in nearly every culture, with many civilisati­ons associatin­g it with deities and immortalit­y. Gold became one of the most valuable and sought-after metals, and during prehistori­c times, was seen as being a viable currency in certain countries.

A material that was widely distribute­d around the world, gold was believed to be a symbol of wealth among ordinary people. Mankind intuitivel­y placed a high value on its name, associatin­g the metal with power, royalty and cultural elite. Ever since its use throughout ancient civilisati­ons until now, the cultural thinking and associatio­n people have with gold in society has not changed, and it still remains a highly sought-after material.

A material that was widely distribute­d around the world, gold was believed to be a symbol of wealth among ordinary people

 ?? IMAGE © SHUTTERSTO­CK ?? ABOVE Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon, Myanmar was first built between the 6th and 10th centuries AD. The gold seen on the stupa is made of genuine gold plates, covering the brick structure and attached by traditiona­l rivets. From ordinary citizens to royalty, people all over the country have donated gold to the pagoda to maintain it
IMAGE © SHUTTERSTO­CK ABOVE Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon, Myanmar was first built between the 6th and 10th centuries AD. The gold seen on the stupa is made of genuine gold plates, covering the brick structure and attached by traditiona­l rivets. From ordinary citizens to royalty, people all over the country have donated gold to the pagoda to maintain it

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