TASSIE LEADS IN WOOD FIRST POL­ICY

This for­ward-look­ing pol­icy helps to se­cure the fu­ture of the Tas­ma­nian tim­ber in­dus­try and sup­ports the Tas­ma­nian econ­omy. - Tim­berlink We hope other State Govern­ments will closely con­sider the ex­am­ple set by the Tas­ma­nian Gov­ern­ment. - Planet Ark This

Australasian Timber - - FRONT PAGE -

FEA­TUR­ING TAS­MA­NIAN tim­bers in build­ing con­struc­tion and de­sign is the aim of the just-re­leased Tas­ma­nian

Wood En­cour­age­ment Pol­icy. In a first for any Aus­tralian state, the pol­icy means wood will need to be con­sid­ered for use in fu­ture pub­lic build­ing projects, lead­ing to a wide range of new op­por­tu­ni­ties to utilise Tas­ma­nian tim­ber.

“In last year’s Bud­get, we an­nounced the de­vel­op­ment of a pol­icy to en­cour­age the greater use of wood and wood prod­ucts in gov­ern­ment build­ing projects,” said Guy Bar­nett, Min­is­ter for Re­sources and Min­is­ter for Build­ing and Con­struc­tion.

The Min­is­ter an­nounced the new pol­icy dur­ing a visit to Fed­eral Group’s new MACq 01 Ho­tel, in the water­front precinct of Ho­bart. “Fea­tur­ing lo­cal tim­bers, such as Tas­ma­nian Oak, through­out the in­te­ri­ors, MACq 01 Ho­tel is an ex­am­ple of how we can add value to our for­est in­dus­try through us­ing more wood in build­ing and con­struc­tion.

“We are back­ing our for­est in­dus­try with a pol­icy re­quir­ing that the use of wood be fully con­sid­ered in de­signs where it rep­re­sents value for money and does the job.

“This is all about grow­ing jobs in forestry and help­ing the in­dus­try to meet its tar­get of dou­bling the added value of our wood and wood prod­ucts by 2036.”

Tim­berlink has con­grat­u­lated the Tas­ma­nian Gov­ern­ment on its new wood first pol­icy.

be­ing the first Aus­tralian state to de­velop a Wood En­cour­age­ment Pol­icy.

“This for­ward-look­ing pol­icy helps to se­cure the fu­ture of the Tas­ma­nian tim­ber in­dus­try and sup­ports the Tas­ma­nian econ­omy,” said Tim­berlink’s CEO Ian Tyson.

“Fur­ther­more, this pol­icy high­lights the gov­ern­ment’s com­mit­ment to the sus­tain­able build­ing en­vi­ron­ment that can only be achieved through the use of tim­ber build­ing ma­te­ri­als.”

Tim­berlink’ Bell Bay mill is Tas­ma­nia’s largest soft­wood mill em­ployer, em­ploy­ing about 200 peo­ple.

Tim­ber is re­new­able, it ab­sorbs car­bon from the at­mos­phere and stores it in the wood, and there are fewer car­bon emis­sions as­so­ci­ated with its pro­duc­tion when com­pared to more en­ergy-in­ten­sive build­ing ma­te­ri­als such as con­crete and steel.

“Tim­berlink looks for­ward to work­ing with its Tas­ma­nian mill, cus­tomers, de­sign­ers and spec­i­fiers to max­imise the op­por­tu­ni­ties for wood cre­ated by this pol­icy. The launch of this pol­icy is cer­tainly ex­cit­ing news for Tas­ma­nia and our Tas­ma­nian em­ploy­ees,” Mr Tyson said.

The an­nounce­ment brings Tas­ma­nia in line with two lo­cal gov­ern­ment au­thor­i­ties and 12 coun­cils across Aus­tralia that have adopted WEPs since De­cem­ber 2014, in­clud­ing Latrobe City and East Gipp­s­land Shire in Vic­to­ria, and Fraser Coast Re­gional and Gympie Re­gional in Queens­land, which an­nounced their adop­tion of WEPs ear­lier this year.

“We are de­lighted to see the Tas­ma­nian Gov­ern­ment demon­strate such strong lead­er­ship with this im­por­tant de­ci­sion,” said David Rowl­in­son, Planet Ark’s Make It Wood Cam­paign Man­ager.

“The adop­tion of a WEP is a pos­i­tive move for the en­vi­ron­ment and it is very en­cour­ag­ing to see a gov­ern­ment sup­port this at a state-wide level. We hope other State Govern­ments will closely con­sider the ex­am­ple set by the Tas­ma­nian Gov­ern­ment,” he said.

“Re­spon­si­bly sourced, cer­ti­fied tim­ber is the only ma­jor build­ing ma­te­rial that helps tackle cli­mate change. Tim­ber is re­new­able, it ab­sorbs car­bon from the at­mos­phere and stores it in the wood, and there are fewer car­bon emis­sions as­so­ci­ated with its pro­duc­tion when com­pared to more en­er­gy­in­ten­sive build­ing ma­te­ri­als such as con­crete and steel. Wood is also cost-ef­fec­tive and quick to con­struct,” Mr Rowl­in­son said.

Planet Ark has worked closely with For­est and Wood Prod­ucts Aus­tralia (FWPA) to raise na­tional aware­ness of WEPs through its Make It Wood cam­paign. Na­tional Mar­ket­ing and Com­mu­ni­ca­tions Man­ager at FWPA, Eileen New­bury, also wel­comed the an­nounce­ment.

“This is a mo­men­tous day for the Aus­tralian for­est and wood prod­ucts in­dus­try. It recog­nises that sus­tain­ably sourced tim­ber has the po­ten­tial to play a sig­nif­i­cant role in help­ing Aus­tralia to achieve our car­bon emis­sion tar­gets, while also con­tribut­ing to the economies of lo­cal and re­gional com­mu­ni­ties,” Ms New­bury said.

Planet Ark’s lat­est re­search re­port, Wood – Na­ture In­spired De­sign which is an up­date of the Wood – Hous­ing, Health, Hu­man­ity Re­port, has also shown ex­po­sure to build­ings made from tim­ber and wooden fur­nish­ings and fit­tings has proven ben­e­fits to phys­i­o­log­i­cal and psy­cho­log­i­cal health and well­be­ing, sim­i­lar to those ex­pe­ri­enced by spend­ing time in na­ture.

The Aus­tralian For­est Prod­ucts As­so­ci­a­tion (AFPA) con­grat­u­lated the Tas­ma­nian Gov­ern­ment for be­com­ing the first Aus­tralian state to adopt a Wood En­cour­age­ment Pol­icy (WEP), and urged all ju­ris­dic­tions to adopt sim­i­lar poli­cies to boost the use of tim­ber prod­ucts in lo­cal build­ing and con­struc­tion projects.

Plau­dits also came from the Aus­tralian For­est Prod­ucts As­so­ci­a­tion (AFPA) Chief Ex­ec­u­tive Of­fi­cer of Ross Hamp­ton, who said the an­nounce­ment by Min­is­ter for Re­sources Guy Bar­nett – and sim­i­lar WEPs adopted by mu­nic­i­pal coun­cils around Aus­tralia – recog­nised the enor­mous en­vi­ron­men­tal and com­mer­cial ben­e­fits of us­ing tim­ber in con­struc­tion.

“The rea­sons pol­icy mak­ers are tak­ing this stance is sim­ple – tim­ber prod­ucts are com­pletely re­new­able, biodegrad­able and store car­bon, play­ing a pos­i­tive role in re­duc­ing green­house gas emis­sions,” Mr Hamp­ton said.

“We are see­ing in­creas­ing recog­ni­tion in Aus­tralia of the en­vi­ron­men­tal ad­van­tages of build­ing with sus­tain­able tim­ber, as well as the ben­e­fits of ver­sa­til­ity and speed of con­struc­tion. This is ev­i­dent through the in­creas­ing use of new tech­nolo­gies such as Cross-Lam­i­nated Tim­ber (CLT) for ma­jor com­mer­cial de­vel­op­ments, which is a win for the en­vi­ron­ment and jobs.”

Un­der Tas­ma­nian’s WEP, pri­vate sec­tor and lo­cal gov­ern­ment build­ing and con­struc­tion projects that re­ceive sup­port from the Tas­ma­nian Gov­ern­ment val­ued at or greater than $500,000 from the Gov­ern­ment, or are to be leased by Gov­ern­ment, will need to fully con­sider the use of wood.

Mr Hamp­ton said Tas­ma­nia had a strong for­est prod­ucts in­dus­try which stood to ben­e­fit from the WEP, but cau­tioned the Tas­ma­nian Gov­ern­ment not to limit the ben­e­fits of the pol­icy by ap­ply­ing “buy lo­cal” re­quire­ments.

David Rowl­in­son of Planet Ark.

Guy Bar­nett, Min­is­ter for Re­sources and Min­is­ter for Build­ing and Con­struc­tion.

Ross Hamp­ton, CEO of AFPA

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