THINGS YOUR BOSS WON’T TELL YOU AND WHY

One in four work­ers say they dis­like their boss. So how can you en­sure you’re not another num­ber in the statis­tic?

Business First - - FRANCHISE -

Stan Gor­don

is CEO, Fran­chised Food Com­pany.

Atrans­par­ent cul­ture is a pos­i­tive thing to strive for in any work­place. Whether you’re man­ag­ing a café crew, over­see­ing a mar­ket­ing agency or look­ing af­ter a sport­ing team, trans­parency is a key com­po­nent for cre­at­ing and main­tain­ing trust and in turn, form­ing a team en­vi­ron­ment that fos­ters a pro­duc­tive work­place.

How­ever, de­spite the level of in­tent to at­tain this ide­al­is­tic work sce­nario, there are still many things that your man­ager won’t tell you; be­cause they trust you’ll use your ini­tia­tive to do your job prop­erly… and there are just some things only a “boss needs to know”.

Any man­ager worth their salt is good at both ob­serv­ing and also of­fer­ing pro­duc­tive feed­back at the ap­pro­pri­ate time, and keep­ing in check in­for­ma­tion that doesn’t need to be broad­cast.

It is im­por­tant to re­alise the un­tapped value that ex­ists in hav­ing an ap­pre­ci­a­tion and un­der­stand­ing of what your man­ager is think­ing and look­ing out for, for both pro­mo­tion and also the over­all ben­e­fit of your work­place.

We want you to un­der­stand the work­place from the per­spec­tive of man­age­ment (just a lit­tle bit).

Some­times it’s hard for your team to re­alise things from the per­spec­tive of man­age­ment. (Sales turnover does not equal profit). It’s true that the fur­ther up the rank you are, the more ac­count­able you are too. This is some­thing to keep in mind when re­ceiv­ing feed­back you might not like. It’s a dif­fi­cult per­spec­tive to un­der­stand un­til you’re in a po­si­tion of se­nior lead­er­ship – but it’s when you be­gin to re­ally re­alise the im- por­tance of com­mu­ni­ca­tion, ini­tia­tive and keep­ing things tick­ing over.

Un­der­stand­ing how you can help your man­ager, rather than hin­der them, will give you key in­sights on how to be of bet­ter ser­vice to your team and over­all, the busi­ness.

We are ob­serv­ing how you in­ter­act with your team

Team­work is the pin­na­cle of the mod­ern work­place. There are very few in­stances nowa­days where peo­ple op­er­ate alone in iso­la­tion and away from a col­lab­o­ra­tive style of work. Even if your ac­tiv­ity is pre­dom­i­nantly work­ing solo, you’re likely de­liv­er­ing work to another per­son or adding value to another team, sup­plier or con­trac­tor... who might play a sim­i­lar role to a se­nior team leader. Nat­u­rally, you don’t want to let them down.

You may not re­alise, but man­agers and lead­ers are very good at be­ing a ‘fly-on-the-wall’. Team mem­bers pre­pared to con­trib­ute to a pos­i­tive en­vi­ron­ment sup­port­ing their team, rather than only look­ing out for numero uno is some­thing that def­i­nitely doesn’t go un­no­ticed by the boss.

De­spite the ob­vi­ous rea­sons for cul­ti­vat­ing a col­lab­o­ra­tive and in­spir­ing team en­vi­ron­ment such as a pos­i­tive work­ing cul­ture and a happy team, achiev­ing this from a man­age­ment per­spec­tive, en­sures projects run smoothly with­out per­sonal con­flicts and of­fice pol­i­tics get­ting in the way. No-one wants to be the sub­ject of of­fice gos­sip.

Your at­ti­tude, qual­ity of work and man­ag­ing your work­load counts

The per­son you bring to work sets a pow­er­ful prece­dent for how other peo­ple in­ter­act with you and also how your team leader works with you. Your at­ti­tude, the qual­ity of work you bring to the ta­ble and your abil­ity to stay on top of your work­load, are key things your man­ager is ob­serv­ing, but not knock­ing you on the shoul­der about ev­ery five min­utes.

I be­lieve one of the most pow­er­ful as­sets you can bring to the work­place is your at­ti­tude – it’s what prob­a­bly landed you the gig in the first place! Hav­ing a sup­port­ive and team-fo­cused out­look is some­thing that us man­agers are con­stantly on the look­out for, and a qual­ity fel­low team mem­ber’s rel­ish. If you’ve got the abil­ity to rise above small set­backs and con­tinue to thrive in the work­place and get things done, your

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.