How help­ing at your kid’s school can be ben­e­fi­cial

Central and North Burnett Times - - OPINION YOUR SAY -

HAVE you con­sid­ered help­ing out at your child’s school? Schools are al­ways look­ing for vol­un­teers to get in­volved, whether its on the par­ents and friends as­so­ci­a­tion, or on ex­cur­sions, as a par­ent reader, or in the tuck­shop.

There re­ally are a myr­iad of ways to help out, with the added bonus of your in­volve­ment in the school com­mu­nity show­ing your child that you value their school­ing. It even has links to so­cial and aca­demic ben­e­fits for your child.

You could start help­ing out from the mo­ment they are in Prep, but it could be the start of Year 6 or at their high school.

In the end it’s never too late to get in­volved and it’s sim­ply a mat­ter of putting up your hand to help out.

Ben­e­fits

Hav­ing a re­spect­ful re­la­tion­ship with your child’s teacher and the school in gen­eral of­fers a clear com­mu­ni­ca­tion chan­nel that re­lays in­for­ma­tion about your child’s ed­u­ca­tion back to you.

It pro­vides a range of ben­e­fits as op­posed to only be­ing in­volved if the school calls you in when your child is strug­gling or hav­ing be­havioural is­sues.

You are also be­ing a role model to your child by fos­ter­ing a pos­i­tive at­ti­tude in them about at­tend­ing school and be­ing en­thu­si­as­tic in the class­room.

Stud­ies have shown a par­ent be­ing ac­tive at the school in­creases their child’s at­ten­dance at school, helps their aca­demic re­sults, en­cour­ages in­volve­ment in school ac­tiv­i­ties, and im­proves their chances of fin­ish­ing school and go­ing on to post­sec­ondary ed­u­ca­tion.

Tak­ing the first step

It’s sim­ple! Start by talk­ing to your child’s teacher at pick-up and drop-off times.

This sort of in­for­mal con­tact keeps you aware of what’s go­ing on in the class­room and can pro­vide ad­vice on how to help with home­work.

There are numer­ous other ways to be in­volved, whether it’s vol­un­teer­ing in a read­ing group dur­ing the morn­ing, be­ing a par­ent helper on an ex­cur­sion or putting your hand up for tuck­shop duty.

Timetable trou­ble

Maybe school hours aren’t suit­able to you, but there are al­ways other op­tions, whether it’s at­tend­ing par­ent as­so­ci­a­tion meet­ings, as­sist­ing at the work­ing bees or at­tend­ing a fundrais­ing event.

Be­ing seen to pro­vide a help­ing hand will help you build pos­i­tive re­la­tion­ships with fel­low par­ents, teach­ers and other staff.

High school

It may seem more dif­fi­cult to be in­volved at a high school where the fa­cil­ity is big­ger and there are many more teach­ers.

A great way to start is to in­tro­duce your­self to your child’s home room (or roll-call) teacher as well as the year level co-or­di­na­tor. These teach­ers will have the best idea of your child’s over­all progress and any be­havioural con­cerns.

If you be­lieve your child is hav­ing trou­ble with a par­tic­u­lar sub­ject it is worth mak­ing the time to chat to that teacher rather than wait­ing for the for­mal par­ent teacher in­ter­views. You can ar­range such a meet­ing through the school’s ad­min­is­tra­tion.

Con­tact us

If you’re a par­ent seek­ing ex­tra sup­port on any is­sue, call your WBHHS child health team on: Gayn­dah – 4161 3571 Mun­dub­bera – 4161 3571 Monto – 4166 9300 Biggen­den – 4127 6400 Eidsvold – 4165 7100 Even if you just want to have a chat and a bit of re­as­sur­ance, the WBHHS child health team is here to help.

STUD­IES HAVE SHOWN A PAR­ENT BE­ING AC­TIVE AT THE SCHOOL IN­CREASES THEIR CHILD’S AT­TEN­DANCE AT SCHOOL, HELPS THEIR ACA­DEMIC RE­SULTS, EN­COUR­AGES IN­VOLVE­MENT IN SCHOOL AC­TIV­I­TIES, AND IM­PROVES THEIR CHANCES OF FIN­ISH­ING SCHOOL ...

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.