How to help kids cope with dis­ap­point­ment and stay pos­i­tive

Central and North Burnett Times - - LIFE­STYLE - Zu Ying, kidspot.com.au

CORO­N­AVIRUS has come with changes kids have not ex­pe­ri­enced. The lock­down may worry them since they may not grasp the se­ri­ous­ness of the sit­u­a­tion. Hol­i­days and en­gage­ments have been can­celled. This is bound to be dis­ap­point­ing for lit­tle ones. Here we dis­cuss how to help kids cope with dis­ap­point­ment and other be­havioural prob­lems.

1. Ac­knowl­edge and share the dis­ap­point­ment to­gether.

Al­low your child to feel and ex­press their emo­tion. As­sure them that this is nor­mal and you share the feel­ing.

2. Help them plan strate­gies to move on.

Af­ter your child un­bur­dens them­selves, help them take it for­ward. Ask the ad­van­tages of be­ing at home. En­cour­age them to find ac­tiv­i­ties they want to do in a stay-at-home hol­i­day.

3. Help the very young to stop tantrums and calm.

Tantrums oc­cur when your child is feel­ing emo­tion­ally dis­turbed but is not able to ex­press it. Prac­tise preven­tion or dis­tract them be­fore things go out of hand. Stay calm and try to use hu­mour to dis­si­pate the ten­sion.

4. Strate­gise a new nor­mal for th­ese times with them.

In­spire them to chalk out a new stay-in rou­tine. Sit down and plan the new struc­ture to­gether. Ask for their sug­ges­tions. En­cour­age them to plan for all the school­work, chores and ac­tiv­i­ties.

5. Plan var­ied ac­tiv­i­ties to keep them en­gaged.

Make chores a fam­ily time. Dis­trib­ute chores to suit each child. Trust them with the work and let them be re­spon­si­ble for it.

TIME FOR SUP­PORT: Tantrums oc­cur when your child is feel­ing emo­tion­ally dis­turbed but is not able to ex­press it in other ways.

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