HOW TO… LOOK BACK WITH NO ANGER

Collective Hub - - AT WORK - QUIT THE CON­STANT VENT SES­SIONS

Hold­ing a grudge in­creases stress, height­ens blood pres­sure, cre­ates fa­cial ten­sion and even causes you to sweat more, says re­search con­ducted by Hope Col­lege in the US. Learn to let go with these sci­ence-backed strate­gies… One of the first steps in let­ting go is to talk less harshly about the of­fence and the of­fender, sug­gests the Stan­ford For­give­ness Project – a se­ries of re­search pa­pers that stud­ied the ‘stress cy­cle’ caused by hold­ing a grudge. When us­ing kin­der lan­guage to talk about an in­ci­dent, it re­duced peo­ple’s stress lev­els and sense of vic­tim­i­sa­tion.

SWAP SWEAR JARS FOR ‘THANK YOU’ JARS

Have a ‘grat­i­tude jar’ in your of­fice to en­cour­age em­ploy­ees to ap­pre­ci­ate each other and the ben­e­fits of work­ing in that en­vi­ron­ment, says business coach Denise Chilton. Af­ter 45 days of en­forced grat­i­tude, you can re­pro­gram your brain to fo­cus on the good, ac­cord­ing to Loretta Graziano Bre­un­ing, au­thor of Habits of a Happy Brain.

DON’T ‘SHOULD’ ALL OVER EACH OTHER

Tony Rob­bins ex­plains that we hold grudges be­cause we get caught up on how oth­ers ‘should’ have acted in a sit­u­a­tion. “If you want to be stressed, all you have to do is ex­pect life and all the peo­ple in it to think, be­have, speak and act the way you have pre­de­ter­mined they should,” he says. In­stead, re­alise peo­ple did the best they could with the tools they had.

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