Is an in­de­pen­dent woman – on a mis­sion.

Collective Hub - - COLLECTIVE HUB X MURDOCH BOOKS -

WHY DID YOU WRITE A GUIDE BOOK FOR SOLO LIV­ING?

As some­one who lives alone, I wanted to find a book to help me nav­i­gate some of its more treach­er­ous shal­lows and ex­plore the re­ally pos­i­tive as­pects. In Aus­tralia, a quar­ter of all house­holds con­sist of peo­ple liv­ing by them­selves. Yet liv­ing alone is viewed by many as the run­ner-up prize, syn­ony­mous with some kind of fail­ure.

WHAT ARE THE CHAL­LENGES YOU COVER IN IT?

Of­ten it’s not the big things that are the chal­leng­ing as­pects of liv­ing alone, but the small, re­lent­less, prac­ti­cal tasks that threaten to over­whelm solo-livers. I cover cook­ing for one, tips on health and solo fi­nances, along with emo­tional ad­vice on mo­ti­va­tion, re­silience, and the op­por­tu­ni­ties for self-dis­cov­ery.

WOULD YOU DE­SCRIBE THE WRITER’S LIFE AS LONELY?

I didn’t see book writ­ing as a par­tic­u­larly iso­lat­ing ex­pe­ri­ence – no more so than any­thing else I do! The process has been quite so­cia­ble, ac­tu­ally. I’ve in­ter­viewed some won­der­ful peo­ple. Like so many stereo­types (the cat-own­ing woman!) the ‘lonely author in the at­tic’ isn’t very ac­cu­rate, at least for me! The worst type of lone­li­ness is be­ing alone in a re­la­tion­ship, and it’s all too com­mon.

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