Mi­cro-needling

Cosmopolitan (Australia) - - Beauty -

Over the past year, mi­cro-needling has gone from an ob­scure pro­ce­dure to a must-do for any­one with acne scar­ring, pig­men­ta­tion or rosacea. Skin­sti­tut’s res­i­dent skin ex­pert Zoe Devine says it’s all be­cause of so­cial me­dia: ‘Ev­ery­one’s talk­ing about it so much more,’ she says. ‘I think in the past ev­ery­body was a lit­tle bit scared of it.’

Mi­cro-needling – also known as derma-rolling and skin-needling – claims to spur col­la­gen pro­duc­tion by cre­at­ing tiny mi­cro-in­juries on the sur­face of the skin. ‘You cre­ate a con­trolled amount of trauma which ig­nites the skin’s nat­u­ral wound healing re­sponse,’ Devine says, ‘which re­leases growth fac­tors to re­struc­ture the skin, re­model scar tis­sue and pro­duce healthy col­la­gen’. It also makes your skin­care more ef­fec­tive as the nee­dles lit­er­ally push the prod­uct into your skin.

Re­cently, the pro­ce­dure has evolved. While derma-rollers (hand­held rollers covered in tiny spikes) used to be com­mon­place in-clinic, now they’re usu­ally re­served for at-home treat­ments. Most pro­fes­sion­als use derma-pens: a de­vice that pushes the nee­dles into the skin over 100 times in a sec­ond. Clin­i­cians use nee­dles be­tween 0.5 mil­lime­tres and 1.5 mil­lime­tres long – the longer the spike, the more vis­i­ble the re­sults.

Fol­low­ing the pro­ce­dure, you’ll be a lit­tle red, but there’s hardly any down­time. And if you have some­where to be, you can cover up with a lit­tle min­eral pow­der.

Skin-needling is avail­able at Laser Clin­ics Aus­tralia for $350 for an all-over fa­cial treat­ment.

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