Faster

It’s the af­ter-hours haunt of Syd­ney’s hos­pi­tal­ity crews – and our very own Phoebe Wood. Now you can re-cre­ate Chi­na­town leg­end Golden Cen­tury’s great­est hits at home.

delicious - - CONTENTS - PHO­TOG­RA­PHY NIGEL LOUGH STYLING KIRSTEN JENK­INS MER­CHAN­DIS­ING EMMALY STE­WART

Phoebe Wood takes Asian in­spi­ra­tion from a late-night leg­end.

“WHEN IT COMES TO LATE-NIGHT EATS IN SYD­NEY, YOU CAN’T GO PAST SPINNING THE LAZY SU­SAN AT CHI­NA­TOWN’S GOLDEN CEN­TURY. AND IF YOU ASK ANY CHEF WHAT TO OR­DER, XO PIPIS WILL BE THE RESOUNDING RE­SPONSE. THESE RECIPES TAKE IN­SPI­RA­TION FROM THE ICONIC DIN­ING IN­STI­TU­TION, AND THE MANY GREAT FOOD MEM­O­RIES I HAVE OF IT.”

Phoebe Wood, Food Di­rec­tor

PIPIS IN XO AND ’NDUJA SERVES 4-6 AS PART OF A SHARED MEAL

1/4 cup (60ml) sun­flower oil 4 long green shal­lots, chopped

1/ 2 bunch gar­lic shoots, chopped 2cm piece (10g) gin­ger, finely chopped 100g ’nduja (spread­able spicy salami) 21/ 2 tbs good-qual­ity XO sauce

(we used Lee Kum Kee brand) 2 tsp each corn­flour and caster su­gar 2 tbs Chi­nese rice wine (shaohs­ing –

from Asian food shops) 1kg pot-ready pipis

Heat oil in a wok over medium-high heat. Add shal­lot, gar­lic shoot, gin­ger and ’nduja, and cook, break­ing up ’nduja with a wooden spoon, for 1-2 min­utes or un­til oil be­gins to separate. Add XO sauce and stir to com­bine.

Com­bine corn­flour, su­gar and shaohs­ing in a bowl to dis­solve corn­flour. Add to wok and sim­mer for 1 minute, then add pipis and cover with a lid. Cook, shak­ing wok, for 3-4 min­utes or un­til pipis open. Dis­card any that re­main closed. Trans­fer to a serv­ing plat­ter and serve im­me­di­ately.

FRIED RICE WITH CUT­TLE­FISH SERVES 4-6 AS PART OF A SHARED MEAL

Cook rice the day be­fore for best re­sults.

3 cut­tle­fish tubes, very thinly sliced 2 tsp sesame oil 11/ 2 tsp hot chill condi­ment 1 tbs light soy sauce 2 tbs peanut oil 5 smoked ba­con rash­ers, chopped 4 long green shal­lots, thinly sliced 4 gar­lic cloves, roughly chopped 4cm piece (20g) gin­ger, finely chopped 3 eggs, lightly beaten 11/ 2 cups medium-grain rice, cooked ac­cord­ing to packet in­struc­tions, cooled com­pletely Fried Asian shal­lots, to serve

Place cut­tle­fish in a bowl with 1/2 tsp sesame oil, chilli condi­ment and 2 tsp soy. Set aside to mar­i­nate for 5 min­utes.

Heat peanut oil over high heat and add ba­con. Cook, stir­ring with a me­tal spoon, for 2-3 min­utes or un­til light golden and fat is ren­dered from ba­con. Add shal­lot, gar­lic and gin­ger, and stir for 30 sec­onds or un­til fra­grant. Add egg and stir, break­ing egg up with spoon, un­til just cooked. Add rice, stir to coat and cook, with­out stir­ring, for 2-3 min­utes to cre­ate a golden crust on un­der­side of rice. Stir again and re­peat to form crust. Trans­fer rice mix­ture to a bowl.

Re­turn pan to high heat and add cut­tle­fish and mari­nade. Stir for 1 minute or un­til just cooked, then re­turn rice to wok and stir to coat. Sea­son with re­main­ing 2 tsp soy and re­main­ing 11/ 2 tsp sesame oil. Serve scat­tered with fried shal­lots.

SWEET & SOUR PORK SERVES 4-6 AS PART OF A SHARED MEAL

1/ 3 cup (50g) potato flour (from health food shops and Asian food shops) 2/ 3 cup (100g) plain flour, plus 2 tbs ex­tra 11/ 3 cup (330ml) chilled soda wa­ter 1kg pork ten­der­loin, cut into 3cm pieces Sun­flower oil, to deep-fry Sliced red chilli and co­rian­der, to serve

SWEET & SOUR SAUCE

1 cup (250ml) chicken stock

1/ 2 cup (125ml) tomato ketchup 11/ 3 cup (330g) brown su­gar 11/ 3 cup (330ml) rice wine vine­gar 1 cup (250ml) light soy sauce 1 tsp Chi­nese fi­five spice pow­der 1/ 2 (about 500g) ripe pineap­ple, peeled, finely chopped

For sweet and sour sauce, place all in­gre­di­ents in a large fry­pan over medi­umhigh heat and cook, stir­ring to dis­solve su­gar. Sim­mer for 20-30 min­utes or un­til slightly thick­ened. Re­move from heat and set aside, then whiz with a hand blender un­til smooth. Re­turn to pan.

To make bat­ter, com­bine potato flour, flour and soda wa­ter in a bowl and whisk un­til smooth. Half-fill a saucepan with oil and heat to 190°C (a cube of bread will turn golden in 55 sec­onds when oil is hot enough). In batches, toss pork with ex­tra 2 tbs flour to coat, then dip in bat­ter, al­low­ing ex­cess to drip off. Add to oil and cook, turn­ing, for 3-4 min­utes or un­til golden and crisp. Re­move with a slot­ted spoon and drain on pa­per towel. Re­peat with re­main­ing pork and bat­ter.

Re­heat sauce over medium heat and add fried pork. Serve with chilli and co­rian­der.

BEEF BRISKET HOT POT SERVES 6 AS PART OF A SHARED MEAL

Be­gin this recipe at least 8 hours ahead.

1 tbs peanut oil 1kg cen­tre-cut beef brisket 4cm piece (20g) gin­ger, sliced 4 star anise 4 gar­lic cloves, sliced 4 thick strips or­ange peel 1 onion, thinly sliced 1/ 3 cup (80ml) oys­ter sauce 1/4 cup (60g) brown su­gar 1 cup (250g) Chi­nese rice wine (shaohs­ing – from Asian food shops) 2/ 3 cup (165ml) Chi­nese black (chinkiang) vine­gar (from Asian food shops) 1/ 3 cup (80ml) light soy sauce 6 dried shi­itake mush­rooms 1 cin­na­mon quill 10 dried red chill­ies 150g fresh shi­itake mush­rooms

Heat oil in a cast-iron pan over medi­umhigh heat. Sea­son fat side of brisket, then place, fat-side down, in pan and ren­der fat for 6-7 min­utes or un­til deep golden. Turn and seal op­po­site side for 2-3 min­utes or un­til golden. Re­move brisket from pan and dis­card fat. Re­turn brisket to pan and re­turn to heat. Add re­main­ing in­gre­di­ents, ex­cept fresh shi­itake, and cover with wa­ter (about 2 cups). Bring to the boil. Re­duce heat to low, cover with a lid and sim­mer for 7-8 hours or un­til brisket is very ten­der. Stir through fresh shi­itake in last 10 min­utes of cook­ing time. Sea­son and serve.

SWEET CORN SOUP SERVES 4-6 AS PART OF A SHARED MEAL

3 es­chalots, finely chopped 2cm piece (10g) gin­ger, finely chopped 1 long green chilli, finely chopped,

plus ex­tra sliced chilli to serve

“THIS RECIPE IS SURF ’N’ TURF AT ITS BEST, BE­CAUSE IT ALSO IN­CLUDES MY FAVOURITE FOOD – NOO­DLES! ADD EX­TRA CHILLI DE­PEND­ING ON YOUR TOL­ER­ANCE LEV­ELS.”

“HONEY CHICKEN MIGHT BE RETRO, BUT IT DEF­I­NITELY DE­SERVES TO BE RE­VIVED. USE A GOOD-QUAL­ITY HONEY FOR THE BEST FLAVOUR.”

50g un­salted but­ter 5 corn cobs, ker­nels sliced 5 cups (1.25L) chicken stock 1/4 cup (60ml) Chi­nese rice wine (shaohs­ing – from Asian food shops) 1 tbs light soy sauce 2 tsp rice wine vine­gar Sesame seeds and shred­ded long green

shal­lots, to serve

Place es­chalot, gin­ger, chilli and but­ter in a large saucepan over medium-low heat. Cook, stir­ring oc­ca­sion­ally, for 5-6 min­utes or un­til soft­ened. Add corn ker­nels and stir to coat. Add stock and shaohs­ing, and bring to a sim­mer. Cook, stir­ring oc­ca­sion­ally, for 12-15 min­utes or un­til corn is very soft. Add soy and rice wine vine­gar. Trans­fer half soup to a blender and whiz un­til smooth. Re­turn to pan. Di­vide soup among bowls and scat­ter with ex­tra green chilli, sesame seeds and shal­lot to serve.

HONEY CHICKEN SERVES 4-6 AS PART OF A SHARED MEAL

2/ 3 cup (100g) self-rais­ing flour 700g skin­less chicken thigh fil­lets, cut into thirds 1/ 2 tsp bi­car­bon­ate of soda 80g potato flour (from health food shops

and Asian food shops) 11/ 3 cups (330ml) chilled soda wa­ter 1 egg­white, lightly whisked to soft peaks

1/ 3 cup (80ml) light soy sauce 1 cup (250ml) runny honey 1 tsp sesame oil 2 tbs rice wine vine­gar

1/ 2 tsp sam­bal oelek Sun­flower oil, to deep-fry Toasted sesame seeds, to serve

Place 2 tbs self-rais­ing flour in a bowl, add chicken and toss to coat. Place bi­carb, potato flour and re­main­ing self-rais­ing flour in a sec­ond large bowl. Make a well in the cen­tre and add soda wa­ter, whisk­ing to com­bine, then stir in egg­white.

Place soy, honey, sesame, vine­gar and sam­bal in a large fry­pan over medium heat and stir to com­bine. Bring to a sim­mer and cook for 5-6 min­utes or un­til slightly re­duced and honey is dark golden.

Half fill a wok or saucepan with oil and heat to 180°C (a cube of bread will turn golden in 90 sec­onds when oil is hot enough). In 2 batches, dip flour-coated chicken into bat­ter, al­low­ing ex­cess to drip off, and add to oil. Cook, turn­ing oc­ca­sion­ally, for 6-7 min­utes or un­til cooked through. Re­move us­ing a slot­ted spoon and drain on pa­per towel. Re­peat with re­main­ing chicken.

Re­heat honey mix­ture and add chicken, turn­ing with tongs to coat. Ar­range chicken on a plate, driz­zle with some honey mix­ture and scat­ter with sesame seeds to serve.

COM­BI­NA­TION NOO­DLES SERVES 4

250g chicken mince 2 tbs chilli bean paste 100ml sun­flower oil 12 green prawns, peeled (tails in­tact),

de­veined 1 tsp sesame oil 6cm piece (30g) gin­ger, finely chopped 3 gar­lic cloves, finely chopped 2 es­chalots, thinly sliced 5 fresh shi­itake mush­rooms,

finely chopped 10 wa­ter chest­nuts 1 tsp corn­flour

1/ 3 cup (80ml) light soy sauce 2 tsp hoisin sauce 2 tbs chicken stock 300g fresh thin egg noo­dles,

blanched, re­freshed

Heat a wok over high heat. Place mince and chilli bean paste in a bowl and stir to com­bine. Add 2 tbs sun­flower oil to wok and add mince mix­ture. Cook, break­ing up with a wooden spoon, for 5-6 min­utes or un­til golden and cooked through. Trans­fer to a bowl and set aside. Add 1 tbs sun­flower oil to wok, then add prawns and

1/ 2 tsp sesame oil. Cook for 2-3 min­utes or un­til just cooked through. Trans­fer to bowl with mince mix­ture. Heat re­main­ing 2 tbs oil in wok, add gin­ger, gar­lic and es­chalot. Stir for 2-3 min­utes or un­til golden and lightly soft­ened. Add mush­room and chest­nuts, and toss for 30 sec­onds.

Com­bine corn­flour, soy, hoisin and stock in a bowl. Add noo­dles to pan with corn­flour mix­ture and toss to coat. Cook for 1 minute, then re­turn chicken mix­ture to pan and toss to com­bine. Di­vide among bowls and serve.

Pipis in XO and ‘nduja (recipe p 98).

Fried rice with cut­tle­fish (recipe p 98).

@phoe­berose­wood For more crowd-pleas­ing dishes ready in a flash. Sweet & sour pork (recipe p 96).

Com­bi­na­tion noo­dles (recipe p 101).

Honey chicken

Sweet corn soup (recipe p 98).

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