Dat­a­log­ging

Fast Bikes - - TECH -

An­other one of those things that we’d have chewed our own eye­lids off for 10 years ago – but is now com­mon on mod­er­ately fancy road bikes. Built-in dat­a­log­ging was the pre­serve of top GP and su­per­bike race teams, where it could be the whole job for an en­gi­neer to cap­ture and an­a­lyse the data from a bike.

Small com­put­ers store in­for­ma­tion about en­gine revs, speed, brake pres­sure, sus­pen­sion move­ment, gear po­si­tion, coolant tem­per­a­tures, brake tem­per­a­tures, and much more. Af­ter a track ses­sion, the data is down­loaded and en­gi­neers can see what’s hap­pen­ing to the bike at prob­lem ar­eas. Add on a GPS data feed and you can see ex­actly where the bike is at ev­ery data point too.

Now, this set-up is avail­able pri­mar­ily on a stack of Du­catis and Yamaha’s R1M. It’s in­valu­able for work­ing on your set-up at a track of course – just be care­ful not to leave it run­ning when rid­ing on the road. Imag­ine the fun the Old Bill could have if they stop you on your early morn­ing ‘Sun­day blast’ and snaf­fle your data files for a quick look…

PROS – amaz­ingly use­ful for track set-up

CONS – a po­ten­tial mine­field if you use it on the road

THE RECK­ON­ING?

GOOD ON TRACK AIDS – but could be bad for your li­cence aids

Al­ti­tude con­trol? Maybe that’s com­ing next...

‘You’re re­ally slow here, here and here. And there.’

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