START WITH THE SUN­RISE

CHILLY, DARK MORN­INGS MAKE IT HARD TO BOUNCE OUT OF BED WHEN YOU HEAR THAT DREADED ALARM, BUT HERE’S WHY IT’S WORTH DITCHING THE DOONA FOR A WIN­TER WORK­OUT

Fraser Coast Chronicle - - WEEKEND - KARLA GIL­BERT Cham­pion iron­woman and ocean ath­lete Karla Gil­bert is an ac­cred­ited Nutri­tion and Health Coach and cer­ti­fied Level III and IV Fit­ness Trainer, with cer­tifi­cates in Child Nutri­tion and Nutri­tion. READ MORE AT kar­lag­ilbert.com.au

May in Aus­tralia al­ways brings about a sea­sonal change as the tem­per­a­tures drop and we be­gin to feel win­ter peer­ing over the fence.

Say­ing good­bye to our warm, cosy bed and fac­ing the dark morn­ings is enough to stop a lot of us in our tracks.

Bears hi­ber­nate in win­ter, so can our work­outs. Some peo­ple take it as a war­rantable ex­cuse, in that some­thing as sim­ple as the cooler weather can dic­tate their well­be­ing. Usu­ally, though, the sum­mer heat also pro­vides a sim­i­lar ex­cuse.

I find the change in sea­son re­fresh­ing. It en­cour­ages us to swap things around while re­mov­ing the bore­dom of what is fa­mil­iar.

Per­haps you dis­like sweat­ing in the sum­mer­time? Then work­ing out in win­ter is the per­fect op­por­tu­nity to don your walk­ing shoes and en­joy watch­ing the later sun­rise.

You’ll be sur­prised at how much fur­ther or longer you can work­out with­out feel­ing like you are go­ing to keel over in the heat.

If you feel less motivated by a high-in­ten­sity work­out try some­thing tamer such as yoga or pilates to work with your nat­u­ral rhythm.

Let’s de­bunk one myth. You may as­sume wak­ing early for a work­out be­comes sec­ond na­ture if you’ve done it over and over … well, I don’t mean to burst your bub­ble but it doesn’t.

I’ve ex­pe­ri­enced a good 20 years of early morn­ing alarm wake ups and each one was as hard as the pre­vi­ous day’s, so there is sim­ply no point waiting for it to mag­i­cally seem ef­fort­less, es­pe­cially dur­ing win­ter. It can be a huge mind game to ac­tu­ally re­act pos­i­tively to an alarm.

I know the first thing many of us do is look for ex­cuses ... ex­cuses why you need to stay in bed, why you need more sleep, why you’ll do it to­mor­row in­stead. I know, we all do it but if you have a few rea­sons why you should get out of bed up your sleeve it can make a huge dif­fer­ence.

Keep th­ese mind next time your alarm goes off:

1 See­ing the sun­rise is one of life’s sim­ple plea­sures. Most days are spent in­doors dur­ing the cooler months, so it’s nice to soak up some vi­ta­min D and fresh air be­fore the day be­gins and you run out of light in the af­ter­noon.

2 Stay­ing ac­tive helps spark the im­mune sys­tem cells, so it helps to fight off colds and cases of flu. Re­search at Duke Univer­sity in the USA found that car­dio work will not only up the sero­tonin in your skull, but that it is four times more ef­fec­tive at re­duc­ing symp­toms of de­pres­sion if you feel you suf­fer from the win­ter blues.

3 In­stead of crav­ing stodgy com­fort foods, you’ll feel like, and make, health­ier choices through­out the day.

In the end, our mo­ti­va­tion stems from the val­ues we place on main­tain­ing our well­be­ing, but hope­fully th­ese hints may plant a seed.

“IF YOU FEEL LESS MOTIVATED BY A HIGHINTENSITY WORK­OUT TRY YOGA OR PILATES.”

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