BRUSH UP ON YOUR SKILLS

BRING FUR­NI­TURE BACK TO LIFE WITH A COAT OF PAINT

Fraser Coast Chronicle - - WEEKEND - WORDS: TRACEY HORDERN

Did you know you can change the colour, in­deed, the whole look of up­hol­stered fur­ni­ture by paint­ing it? This trans­lates to a hugely eco­nom­i­cal al­ter­na­tive to re-up­hol­ster­ing fur­ni­ture, which can be hard to ar­range and pro­hibitively ex­pen­sive.

It also means chang­ing the look of up­hol­stered fur­ni­ture is some­thing most of us can do eas­ily our­selves at home.

Be­fore you rush out and buy chalk paint by the gal­lon, there are a few caveats. Paint­ing up­hol­stery tends to work best on linen, cotton and mixed­fab­ric pieces that can ab­sorb the paint to an ex­tent.

So, if your cho­sen fur­ni­ture does qual­ify, it’s a fan­tas­tic way to up­cy­cle bed­heads, oc­ca­sional chairs and for­mal din­ing chairs.

The broad out­line of what is re­quired in­cludes us­ing chalk paint, gen­er­ally placed in a mix­ing bowl, then fol­low the prod­uct in­struc­tions as some chalk paints re­quire di­lut­ing with water.

You then wipe down the fab­ric with a cloth to clean it and fol­low that up with a gen­tle spritz­ing of water to all ar­eas you in­tend to paint.

De­pend­ing on the orig­i­nal colour of your up­hol­stered fab­ric and the ef­fect you want to achieve, you would paint any­thing be­tween one to three coats.

Once the paint is dry, gen­tly sand off the rough­ened fin­ish of the paint.

Once you are happy with the feel of the piece, seal it with a wax fin­ish.

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