TOO BROKE FOR BA­SICS

Thou­sands un­able to pay for den­tal, scripts and doc­tor vis­its

Fraser Coast Chronicle - - FRONT PAGE - SHERELE MOODY

POVERTY is push­ing Fraser Coast res­i­dents fur­ther away from health­care, with tens of thou­sands of lo­cals un­able to pay for the ba­sics in­clud­ing scripts and doc­tor vis­its.

Spe­cial NewsRe­gional anal­y­sis of fed­eral health data shows 16,711 – 19.6 per cent – of lo­cal adults were un­able to pay for ba­sic den­tal treat­ment in the 2016-17 fi­nan­cial year.

The re­search also shows about 6650 – 7.8 per cent – of lo­cals could not af­ford to have their med­i­cal pre­scrip­tions filled dur­ing the 12 months.

About 4 per cent of Fraser Coast res­i­dents re­ported not see­ing a GP be­den­tal, cause of cost and the av­er­age out-of­pocket ex­pense was $9–$38.

The Aus­tralian Med­i­cal As­so­ci­a­tion’s Dr San­dra Hirowatari said health poverty was wide­spread.

“For ex­am­ple, one of my di­a­betic pa­tients pur­chased both the med­i­ca­tion and the needed glu­cose mon­i­tor­ing ma­chine,” the chair of the AMA coun­cil’s re­gional and ru­ral doc­tors com­mit­tee said.

“But for her to fol­low my pre­scribed treat­ment, she had to go hun­gry (to pay for the medicine and ma­chine).”

Aus­tralian Den­tal As­so­ci­a­tion pres­i­dent Dr Hugo Sachs said the sit­u­a­tion was com­pounded by the of­ten lengthy wait to ac­cess gov­ern­ment­funded den­tistry clin­ics.

Dr Sachs said life­long im­pacts could flow from not hav­ing rou­tine oral care – in­clud­ing the pos­si­bil­ity of cer­tain can­cers.

“There is an op­por­tu­nity here for gov­ern­ments to re­duce wait­ing lists by in­creas­ing fund­ing,” Dr Sachs said.

“Go­ing with­out den­tal care can lead to sig­nif­i­cant prob­lems for the pa­tient and this will in­crease the cost on the health sys­tem.”

Phar­macy Guild of Aus­tralia’s Greg Turn­bull said he was not sur­prised peo­ple were un­able to pay for scripts.

“It is some­thing that should con­cern health pol­i­cy­mak­ers,” the PGA com­mu­ni­ca­tions di­rec­tor said.

Queensland Coun­cil of So­cial Ser­vices CEO Mark Hen­ley said med­i­cal poverty was not be­ing ad­e­quately ad­dressed by gov­ern­ments.

“There is ab­so­lutely no doubt that there needs to be greater in­vest­ment in health ser­vices, par­tic­u­larly in re­gional ar­eas,” Mr Hen­ley said.

Fed­eral Health Min­is­ter Greg Hunt’s spokesman said an ex­pert com­mit­tee was ex­am­in­ing med­i­cal costs and the govern­ment’s plan to en­cour­age more trainee doc­tors to move to re­gional ar­eas would help in the long run.

- NewsRe­gional

Photo: An­dreyPopov

NO BA­SICS: Poverty is push­ing our re­gion’s res­i­dents fur­ther away from health­care, with lo­cals un­able to pay for the ba­sics in­clud­ing den­tal, scripts and doc­tor vis­its.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.