Tack­ling the to-do list to­gether

NO ONE LIKES DO­ING CHORES – ES­PE­CIALLY WHEN ONE PART­NER IS TAK­ING ON THE LION’S SHARE. IF THAT SOUNDS LIKE YOU, YOU MAY WANT TO PUT DOWN THE TO-DO LIST AND READ THIS…

Good Health (Australia) - - Content -

Who did or didn’t empty the dish­washer, who last took out the bins, and who has to pick up the kids from school may seem like mi­nor ne­go­ti­a­tions in a mar­riage, but they can have an out­size ef­fect on the qual­ity of your re­la­tion­ship. A work­ing pa­per from the Har­vard Busi­ness School and the Uni­ver­sity of Bri­tish Columbia found that 25 per cent of peo­ple who were di­vorced named “dis­agree­ments about house­work” as the top rea­son for sep­a­rat­ing. And, the pa­per found, those who spent more money on time-sav­ing ser­vices, like clean­ers, were more sat­is­fied with their re­la­tion­ships, due in part be­cause they were able to spend more qual­ity time with their part­ners. Even if out­sourc­ing the chores is not an op­tion, here are some ideas that might help to keep the peace:

»Split the chore list. Be­ing clear about which chores you’re tak­ing on, as well as how of­ten you’re do­ing them, can make a dif­fer­ence.

» Go on a date. If you’ve been bogged down with house­work, it can be a good time to step away from do­mes­tic du­ties and re­con­nect with your part­ner.

» Hire a cleaner, as and when you can. If life has been es­pe­cially busy some­times it’s bet­ter to pay for some help, rather than add to the pres­sure of an al­ready long to-do list.

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