"Sleep de­pri­va­tion in chil­dren mim­ics the symp­toms of At­ten­tion De­fi­cient Hy­per­ac­tiv­ity Dis­or­der. "

Great Health Guide - - KIDS MATTERS -

1. EN­SURE YOUR CHILD RE­CEIVES ENOUGH SLEEP DAILY

Typ­i­cally, the younger the child, the more sleep they re­quire over a 24-hour pe­riod. Younger chil­dren also re­quire day naps to man­age fa­tigue. In say­ing this, most chil­dren still re­quire at least 11-13 hours of sleep overnight un­til the age of 10 years.

2. SET A CON­SIS­TENT EARLY BED­TIME

A bed­time be­tween 6pm and 8pm helps en­sure your child re­ceives enough night sleep. Thus, go­ing to bed at the same time each night will keep your child’s body clock in line.

3. HAR­NESS THE POWER OF A BED­TIME ROU­TINE

A good rou­tine does more that phys­i­cally pre­pare you for bed. It cues the body and brain that sleep is com­ing. The rou­tine needs to be long enough for the body to wind down, but short enough for your child’s brain to an­tic­i­pate what’s com­ing next. Around 30 - 45 min­utes is ideal.

4. LIMIT SCREEN TIME FOR AN HOUR BE­FORE BED

The light emit­ted from screens sup­presses mela­tonin, (the sleep hor­mone) and this can greatly con­trib­ute to sleep is­sues.

5. AL­LOW OP­POR­TU­NI­TIES TO CATCH UP

Life hap­pens and there will be late nights and missed sleep at times. The key to re­cov­er­ing quickly is to al­low your child the op­por­tu­nity to catch up. That may mean an ex­tra nap or an ear­lier bed­time for a few days. While you can’t make a child sleep, you can en­cour­age and give them clear so­cial cues that sleep is ex­pected. Please seek help if sleep isn’t go­ing well. Be­cause every­one needs a good night’s sleep!

Kim Corley is a cer­ti­fied baby and child sleep con­sul­tant with a Bach­e­lor of Science in psy­chol­ogy and phar­ma­col­ogy. She is also a mother who be­lieves in the heal­ing power of sleep and has helped nu­mer­ous fam­i­lies solve their sleep is­sues over the years. You can con­tact Kim via her web­site.

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