TRANS­FOR­MA­TION ADDS SPICE TO VICE

Guardian Express - - FRONT PAGE - Lucy Ruther­ford

CHRIS­TIAN Bale is com­pletely trans­formed play­ing Cheney in Vice, Adam McKay’s fol­low up to The Big Short that delves into the life of Dick Cheney and his rise to Vice Pres­i­dent dur­ing the Ge­orge W. Bush Jr ad­min­is­tra­tion. Cheney starts out in life as a drunken youth fail­ing col­lege un­til he is pushed to make some­thing of him­self.

US­ING his trade­mark wit and ec­cen­tric style, writer and di­rec­tor Adam McKay’s fol­low up to The Big Short delves into the life of Dick Cheney and his rise to Vice Pres­i­dent dur­ing the Ge­orge W. Bush ad­min­is­tra­tion.

In a com­plete trans­for­ma­tion, Chris­tian Bale plays Cheney, who starts out in life as a drunken youth fail­ing col­lege un­til he is pushed to make some­thing of him­self by soon-tobe wife and child­hood sweet­heart Lynne (Amy Adams).

He joins an in­tern­ship pro­gram for Congress, meets men­tor Don­ald Rums­feld (Steve Carell) and from there be­gins a long ca­reer in and out of pol­i­tics.

His ca­reer es­ca­lates to the ap­point­ment to Vice Pres­i­dent at the re­quest of Bush (Sam Rock­well) just months be­fore the 9/11 at­tack.

Vice has a spe­cific mes­sage in ac­cus­ing Dick Cheney as the man re­spon­si­ble for the deaths of thou­sands in the Iraq War be­cause he wants ac­cess to the coun­try’s abun­dance of oil. More­over, the script lays the blame at so­ci­ety’s door for let­ting politi­cians such as Cheney get away with such atroc­i­ties through inat­ten­tion.

Bale is given the space to por­tray Cheney with nu­ance as a quiet but ruth­less politi­cian and busi­ness­man ded­i­cated to his fam­ily.

How­ever, through the voiceover of an ini­tially name­less man, in­tro­duced as be­ing “re­lated” to Cheney, the for­mer Vice Pres­i­dent is ac­cused as a man with no care for the de­struc­tion caused by his ac­tions.

His in­dif­fer­ence is made ob­vi­ous when he non-fa­tally shoots a man while on a hunt and never apol­o­gises.

The film uses vis­ual metaphors, cut­ting be­tween scenes of politi­cians mak­ing de­ci­sions and shots of bombs ex­plod­ing, as the di­rect con­se­quence of those de­ci­sions.

Such an er­ratic style of edit­ing re­minds the au­di­ence that this movie is but a rep­re­sen­ta­tion of the truth.

For those not versed in Amer­i­can pol­i­tics, Vice re­minds the viewer that politi­cians need to be held ac­count­able, while not of­fer­ing any so­lu­tions.

Chris­tian Bale and Sam Rock­well in Vice.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.