WHETHER YOU BOAST AN UBER ARTIS­TIC STREAK OR ARE FLAT OUT DIFFERENTIATING YOUR MACRAMÉ FROM YOUR CRO­CHET OR YOUR ACRYLICS FROM YOUR OIL PAINTS, RE­SEARCH HAS PROVEN ART IS THE PER­FECT THER­APY.

Haven Magazine - - Front Page -

“Art washes away from the soul the dust of every­day life,” Pablo Pi­casso Anec­do­tally, artists the world over will tell you that art is ther­apy. But did you know that many, many stud­ies have also proven that same point? In 2007, Chloe Bell and Steven Robbins looked at ran­domly as­signed to ei­ther cre­ate an art­work or to view and sort a se­ries of art prints. Three mea­sures of over­all neg­a­tive mood and of anx­i­ety were col­lected be­fore and af­ter each in­ter­ven­tion. in neg­a­tive mood and anx­i­ety in the art pro­duc­tion group. They proved the sim­ple act of cre­at­ing a work of art pro­duced dra­matic re­duc­tions in neg­a­tive mood. In 2012, Re­nee­van der Ven­net and Su­san Serice also proved that colour­ing a man­dala pat­tern re­duces anx­i­ety. “The cre­ative adult is the child who sur­vived.” Let’s get one thing clear – art is not just about lit­tle kids and stubby Cray­ola crayons. The re­cent adult colour­ing-in book craze was proof of that. There were, and still are, a mul­ti­tude of colour­ing Cre­at­ing art, whether that’s metic­u­lously colour­ing in a de­tailed sheet, putting paint on a can­vas or way to stim­u­late your brain and has many proven seen im­proved qual­ity of life via cre­at­ing art. All types of art are gen­er­ally re­lax­ing. Re­lax­ation low­ers stress and leaves you men­tally calm. Other stud­ies have shown that pro­duc­ing art en­hances prob­lem-solv­ing skills, boosts self-es­teem and pro­vides a sense of ac­com­plish­ment. “Art en­ables us to find our­selves and lose our­selves at the same time.” Colour My Pot is a ce­ram­ics stu­dio in Cleve­land, artis­tic mus­cle or just take some time out to do ce­ramic piece from the range avail­able then set about dec­o­rat­ing that piece with the paints and tools pro­vided. One week later, once the item is Colour My Pot di­rec­tor Fleur Col­gan says she gets a good mix of cus­tomers through her stu­dio, from lit­tle kids to se­niors and novices to ex­perts, but one of the grow­ing ar­eas of her busi­ness are adult classes and so­cial paint­ing events which are of­ten booked out well in ad­vance. She reg­u­larly sees groups of friends meet up to en­joy ea­chother’s com­pany just as much as they en­joy the art­form it­self. “It’s a re­ally pop­u­lar thing,” Fleur says. “Peo­ple love to come along, be so­cial and paint a piece – there’s no think­ing in­volved, it’s all about re­lax­ing with it and you get a lovely re­ward at the end.” “Art can per­me­ate the very deep­est part of us, where no words ex­ist,” Eileen Miller Fleur of­ten sees cus­tomers “lose them­selves in art”. “They might come in a lit­tle hes­i­tant to start with, think­ing they can’t paint. But then I see their body lan­guage change. Paint­ing seems to bond strangers.” Fleur says there’s noth­ing bet­ter than watch­ing pieces on their re­turn visit. She says there is such joy in their faces when they re­alise that they’ve ac­tu­ally cre­ated a piece of art. “Art is our one true global lan­guage. It knows no na­tion, it favours no race, it ac­knowl­edges no class,” Richard Kam­ler kids as it does on adults. Speech pathol­o­gist and oc­cu­pa­tional ther­a­pist Sa­man­tha Da­ley says

Words: Belinda Glin­de­mann

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