FIRST BIRTH­DAYS ARE THE BEST. IT’S A MAGIC MILE­STONE FOR ANY PAR­ENT AND PRO­VIDES THE PER­FECT OP­POR­TU­NITY TO START SOME LIFE-LONG TRA­DI­TIONS.

IDEAS FOR BIRTH­DAY TRA­DI­TIONS

Haven Magazine - - Front Page -

I’ll put my hand up right now and say that I’m the uber-sen­ti­men­tal­ist (“men­tal” be­ing the key chunk of text in that word!). I have saved boxes and boxes of kids’ art, ticket stubs, locks of hair, re­ally im­prac­ti­cal kindy box con­struc­tions, mac­a­roni neck­laces, teeny birth­day cakes, school books and more. It’s an in­tense ob­ses­sion and one that I can trace back to pro­vide loads of op­por­tu­ni­ties to start life­long tra­di­tions. When help­ing my mum clear out her wardrobe years back, I res­cued a shirt that she was about to throw out. Some­thing about it res­onated with me. Maybe it was the mega-1970s col­lar, the birth­day. And that there was the lightbulb mo­ment – I would wear the shirt as a sur­prise for mum at to wear that shirt again on my sec­ond daugh­ter’s birth­day and I have now put it away in a spe­cial box • sup­ply some­thing for a time cap­sule that you can open on their 21st. A news­pa­per is a good in­clu­sion. • Buy a piece of jew­ellery that has the abil­ity to be worn by the birth­day child now and into adult­hood. Think neck­laces, ad­justable bracelets, ear­rings. • tree on their spe­cial day. Pho­to­graph your child with that tree each birth­day to fol­low. • Make a birth­day crown (or sim­i­lar) and each year take a photo of your child wear­ing that crown etc. • Buy a chil­dren’s story book (eg. Dr Seuss’s “Oh the places you’ll go”) and each year write a mes­sage to your child in it. Or, write your child a let­ter each year and bind them into a book for their 18th/21st. • Buy your birth­day child a keep­sake plate (even spe­cial sil­ver cut­lery) so they can eat birth­day cake from this plate for years and years to come. • Start a growth chart. A piece of dowel from Bun­nings, painted, is an in­ex­pen­sive and trans­portable way to record growth. • Take your child’s hand print, in paint, ev­ery birth­day and watch them grow into adults. party in the late-1970s. Be­low, the shirt at her

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