THE DAY AF­TER (AKA BOX­ING DAY)

Healthy Food Guide (Australia) - - FEATURES -

OLD THINK­ING

“I’ve al­ready done the dam­age, so I may as well pol­ish o the leftovers in the fridge and get back on track in the New Year.”

MIND­FUL THINK­ING

“I re­ally en­joyed the food yesterday, but I still feel quite full, so I’m go­ing to take it easy today.” When you re­strict foods, they au­to­mat­i­cally be­come more ap­peal­ing. Have you ever no­ticed how tempt­ing chocolate is when you’ve told your­self you can’t have it? Even­tu­ally, sheer willpower will give way and you’ll eat more than just a square or two — fol­lowed by the in­evitable food guilt and the vow to start di­et­ing again on Mon­day. Sounds fa­mil­iar?

This sce­nario is rife at Christ­mas time. Af­ter you’ve scoffed a few too many gin­ger­bread men or chocolate rum balls, it’s easy to feel you’ve ‘blown it’, and to prom­ise your­self you’ll start again on New Year’s Day.

Mind­ful eat­ing al­lows you to train your brain to go about th­ese sit­u­a­tions dif­fer­ently. By giv­ing your­self per­mis­sion to en­joy treat foods if you re­ally feel like them, you let go of the old-style guilt.

So, in­stead of de­vour­ing all of the Christ­mas leftovers on Box­ing Day, lis­ten to your body and opt for a lighter meal and a treat, if you want it. Then, per­haps head out­side for a walk, or play a friendly game of back­yard or beach cricket!

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