Herald Sun

Rogers rides his Lord’s luck

Aussies start well de­spite Warner lapse

- AGEN­CIES WITH BEN HORNE

CHRIS Rogers rode his luck as Aus­tralia made an ex­cel­lent start in the sec­ond Ashes Test against Eng­land at Lord’s last night.

Aus­tralia was 1-104 at lunch on the first day, with David Warner the only bats­man dis­missed, as it looked to level the five-match se­ries at 1-1 af­ter its 169-run de­feat in the first Test in Cardiff last week.

Rogers was 43 not out, on a ground he knows well from his time with Lord’s-based county side Mid­dle­sex, and Steven Smith 16 not out.

Aus­tralia cap­tain Michael Clarke won the toss and elected to bat first on what looked another typ­i­cally good pitch at the home of cricket.

Ini­tially over­cast skies of­fered a hint of swing move­ment.

In the first over, Rogers was for­tu­nate to sur­vive when he edged an in­tended drive off James An­der­son just over the top of the slip cordon for four.

Warner is gen­er­ally the more ag­gres­sive of Aus­tralia’s two left-handed openers, but it took him 25 balls to score his first four last night, pulling first-change Mark Wood.

Rogers did not look se­cure and re­peat­edly played and missed.

By con­trast, Warner started to find his touch with five fours, all off fast bowler Wood, in 13 balls.

Eng­land cap­tain Alastair Cook brought on Moeen Ali af­ter drinks.

But with Aus­tralia de­ter­mined not to let the off-spin­ner set­tle, Warner slog-swept Moeen’s first ball for four.

Moeen, how­ever, had his re­venge five balls later as he dis­missed Warner for the sec­ond time in as many in­nings.

Warner came down the pitch but his lofted drive was caught by An­der­son on the run at deep mid-off and was out for a near run-a-ball 38 that in­cluded seven bound­aries.

It left Aus­tralia 1-78 off ex­actly 15 overs.

Eng­land fielded the same side that won in Cardiff af­ter all-rounder Moeen over­came a slight side strain.

But Ashes holder Aus­tralia — look­ing for its first Test se­ries win in Bri­tain in 14 years — made two changes.

Wicket-keeper Peter Nevill made his in­ter­na­tional de­but af­ter first-choice glove­man Brad Haddin with­drew for per­sonal rea­sons while Mitchell Marsh came in for dropped fel­low all-rounder Shane Wat­son.

For­mer Test wick­et­keeper Ian Healy said be­fore the tour that Nevill would be up to han­dling the pres­sure if handed a de­but.

“I am happy with his emer­gence. When it be­came ob­vi­ous they were not go­ing to pick Chris Hart­ley I felt he was the one who has a good idea about his wicket-keep­ing,” Healy said.

“I would have first seen him five years ago at the elite keep­ers’ camp at the academy.

“He is a good hard worker with a solid and re­peat­able tech­nique.

“He has worked ever harder. He has a game which should hold up un­der pres­sure. He’s good.’’

Sta­tis­tics say that the toss was mas­sive for Clarke to win.

In the three Tests played on Eng­land soil this year (two against New Zealand) the team bat­ting first has won.

Aus­tralia didn’t lose a Test where Clarke won the toss on the last tour in 2013 when Eng­land got up 3-0.

“We’ve had a lot of suc­cess over our history of cricket at Lord’s. It’s a won­der­ful place to play,” Clarke said.

 ??  ?? David Warner holes out to James An­der­son off Moeen Ali, who cel­e­brates with skip­per Alastair Cook (bot­tom right). Opener Chris Rogers (top right) sur­vived some anx­ious mo­ments, in­clud­ing edg­ing this one through the slips cordon.
David Warner holes out to James An­der­son off Moeen Ali, who cel­e­brates with skip­per Alastair Cook (bot­tom right). Opener Chris Rogers (top right) sur­vived some anx­ious mo­ments, in­clud­ing edg­ing this one through the slips cordon.

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