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THE CHAL­LENGES OF REN­O­VAT­ING A SMALL SPACE WITH WET AR­EAS CAN MAKE BATH­ROOM UP­GRADES COM­PLI­CATED AND COSTLY – CHECK OUT THESE IM­POR­TANT TIPS BE­FORE YOU START WORK.

Highfields' Own - - Contents -

Do work out a bud­get in ad­vance

When it comes to up­dat­ing your bath­room, there are a lot more costs than meet the eye.

Car­pen­ter and builder, Dean Ipaviz, warns, “Un­for­tu­nately when ren­o­vat­ing, a lot of peo­ple get caught out fo­cus­ing on the end goal and what the project is go­ing to look like, and they for­get about a lot of un­ex­pected hid­den costs.”

When you’re cre­at­ing your bud­get, don’t for­get de­mo­li­tion works and waste dis­posal, as well as the cost of mov­ing door­ways and lev­el­ling floors to en­sure there’s not a step when en­ter­ing the bath­room.

“[You] need to make sure you’re re­ally do­ing your home­work with this space,” says Dean, “It’s al­ways go­ing to be a costly part of the ren­o­va­tion.”

Above all, be sure to build in a con­tin­gency plan for those un­ex­pected costs that may crop up.

Use mir­rors along­side larger win­dows and higher ceil­ings to make a small space feel larger.

“Mir­rors are a great way of open­ing up spa­ces”, says Dean, “It’s a re­ally cost-ef­fec­tive way of mak­ing a room feel much big­ger.”

Mir­rors achieve this by am­pli­fy­ing light (un­like con­ven­tional walls, which ab­sorb light). If you’re able to po­si­tion your mirror where it will re­flect light from a win­dow, you can vir­tu­ally dou­ble the natural light in your bath­room.

Do com­ply with wa­ter­proof­ing reg­u­la­tions

As per Aus­tralian Stan­dards, shower floors and walls (to a min­i­mum height of 1800mm) must be wa­ter­proofed. Out­side the shower, wa­ter­proof­ing re­quire­ments will de­pend on what type of floor your bath­room has.

“One of the biggest mis­takes Diyers make is they don’t get wa­ter­proof­ing done,” says Dean, “it’s one of the biggest de­fects peo­ple have on any house.”

As a rule, wa­ter­proof­ing is one area where you should en­gage a pro­fes­sional.

Build­ing and plumb­ing works are ar­guably the biggest cost of any bath­room ren­o­va­tion, but they can be min­imised with clever de­sign.

Wher­ever pos­si­ble, try to keep walls, and key el­e­ments such as showers, sinks and toi­lets where they are when you up­grade them.

This means your plumber won’t need to re­lo­cate drainage pipes.

Keep in mind that be­tween your drainage pipes and prized new fix­tures, how­ever, new pip­ing may be re­quired to work with that fancy new mixer tap, or to en­sure ad­e­quate wa­ter pres­sure.

Don’t work be­yond your lim­its

De­pend­ing on where you live, rules for what you can and can’t do your­self will vary, so be sure to check the rel­e­vant reg­u­la­tions.

Sim­i­larly, DIY may void your home in­surance pol­icy, so it’s worth a call to your in­surance com­pany.

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