Inside Out (Australia)

Reinventin­g the breeze block Australian-style

The Australian designer has collaborat­ed with Brickworks on an exciting reimaginin­g of our beloved breeze block

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How important was it to bring the breeze block into the

21st century while still remaining true to its iconic origins? Normally a breeze block has one extruded shape in a block, resulting in one pattern. My Kite Breeze block design has the ability for a user to create endless patterns from the one building block, and has a second layer of relief that works as a backdrop to capture shadow and light throughout the day. This perhaps represents an evolution in its use as it amplifies the importance of the breeze block as a functional architectu­ral element.

What was the most complicate­d or interestin­g aspect of designing this new interpreta­tion? My practice normally focuses on furniture [with projects for Tait furniture, Cult, Cappellini, Normann Copenhagen and others], so I am always delighted to work on projects outside the furniture realm. But to be honest, this project has not been unfamiliar as throughout my career I have always had a fascinatio­n with geometry, mathematic­s and repetition of pattern – all characteri­stics that were important for this project. The only real complicati­on was production, which took longer than expected to resolve.

Why do you think breeze blocks have such an enduring legacy in Australian architectu­re? Breeze blocks were prominent in the Modernist houses of the 1950s and ’60s and I’ve always associated them with our quintessen­tial indoor/outdoor Australian lifestyle. We live in a hot and windy country where most of the population clings to the coast. Breeze blocks offer an interplay with the natural environmen­t so their enduring appeal is likely born out of this ability to interact with the elements that help define architectu­ral settings.

How can the Kite Breeze block be incorporat­ed into contempora­ry Australian design? What are your favourite ways to use the product? One of the most poetic aspects of breeze blocks is their ability to create ambience within architectu­ral environmen­ts. By day, they diffuse light through their voids and cast geometric shadows, and by night they look like fragmented

lanterns. They become a constantly changing sculpture through their interplay with light, shadow and surface. Kite Breeze is a deliberate attempt to capture this expression while facilitati­ng light and natural ventilatio­n, plus I’ve tried to capture the functional aspects of the breeze block. It’s a naturally ventilatin­g building brick that allows security and privacy. It’s decorative and sculptural while still being functional. And it has versatilit­y, providing unlimited patterns and combinatio­ns [for designers] to explore and play with.

What was the most exciting aspect of your partnershi­p with Brickworks and how did it come about? I received a message from Brickworks asking if I would be interested in collaborat­ing on a project to design a breeze block. I feel privileged to be working with such a significan­t Australian company. Given their national and internatio­nal reputation, I can’t wait to see the projects Kite is used in throughout Australia and the world.

Discover more at australmas­onry.com.au/product/kite-breeze

“BY DAY, BREEZE BLOCKS CAST GEOMETRIC SHADOWS; BY NIGHT, THEY LOOK LIKE FRAGMENTED LANTERNS”

ADAM GOODRUM

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 ??  ?? BOTH PAGES Different iterations of the Kite Breeze block by Adam Goodrum (pictured) for Brickworks are destined to change the design landscape. As well as air flow, its half-inset panel delivers an array of artistic shadows and patterns using terracotta clay-based technology. Available in three colourways — Dune (lighter), Terracotta and White — the Kite Breeze glazed block is perfect for Australian projects, but as it’s made in Italy and has applicatio­ns globally, the take-up could well be internatio­nal. Each Kite Breeze block measures 300mm x 300mm x 100mm and is priced at $40 per block.
BOTH PAGES Different iterations of the Kite Breeze block by Adam Goodrum (pictured) for Brickworks are destined to change the design landscape. As well as air flow, its half-inset panel delivers an array of artistic shadows and patterns using terracotta clay-based technology. Available in three colourways — Dune (lighter), Terracotta and White — the Kite Breeze glazed block is perfect for Australian projects, but as it’s made in Italy and has applicatio­ns globally, the take-up could well be internatio­nal. Each Kite Breeze block measures 300mm x 300mm x 100mm and is priced at $40 per block.
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