Kyabram Free Press

Tips for Pruning Roses

-

Pruning rose bushes doesn’t have to be difficult or intimidati­ng.

Rose bushes need to be pruned in a special way, so make pruning more efficient with these tested tips. Roses have a reputation of being difficult to grow—as long as you feed them and prune them correctly, you shouldn’t have too much trouble with these pretty plants. Pruning is a vital element of rose plant care and the longevity of the plant in your garden. In general, you will be pruning rose bushes just before the plant breaks dormancy after spring’s final frost. This will be early in the year in warm climates, and anytime between January and April in cold climates.

If it’s old roses you are tending, prune them after blooming. They bear flowers on last year’s wood. When rose pruning, cut away the dead wood first—it will help you “see” the shape of the plant without distractio­n. It’s a good idea to visit a public rose garden and find specimens of roses you are growing. Note how the gardeners have pruned roses of the same type. In cold-winter climates, pruning roses in spring is often reduced to one option: Simply cut back the wood that was killed in winter. In warm climates, pruning can be done at any of three levels, depending on your purpose.

Severe pruning (cut to leave three or four canes, 6 to 10 inches high) produces fewer but larger blooms. Moderate pruning (five to 12 canes cut to 18 to 24 inches) makes for a larger bush. And light pruning (less than one-third of the plant is thinned out) increases the number of short-stemmed flowers that will be produced.

 ?? ??
 ?? ??

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia