Young brew­ery of­fers a top drop

Life & Style Weekend - - TASTE - For more go to [email protected]­re­gional­me­dia.com.au with Si­mon Ir­win

WHEN you drink Euro­pean beers or English ales or

Irish stouts for that mat­ter, one of the things that amazes those of us who hail from the An­tipodes is the un­be­liev­able age of the brew­eries them­selves.

Guin­ness got crack­ing in 1759.

Kro­nen­bourg in France be­gan brew­ing in 1664 and still mar­kets a drink­able lager car­ry­ing the date as its name. German pu­rity laws spec­i­fy­ing what can go into beer, the

Rein­heits­ge­bot, date from 1516.

In Aus­tralia, things are a bit dif­fer­ent.

Hugh the neigh­bour and I sat down to try a beer nei­ther of us had come across be­fore – the Aus­tralian Brew­ery’s Aus­tralian Pale Ale – a beer from a brew­ery that was es­tab­lished in … 2010.

Start­ing out as a craft brew­ery at­tached to the Aus­tralian Ho­tel in Rouse, Syd­ney, the brew­ery has de­vel­oped a rep­u­ta­tion for in­no­va­tion and, most im­por­tantly, drink­able beers.

In­ter­est­ingly it claims to be the first craft brew­ery in Aus­tralia to can its beer, both to keep its prod­ucts fresher and be eas­ier to re­cy­cle.

The pale ale pours a cloudy yel­low in the glass with a finger of head that lasted to the bot­tom of the glass.

HTN’s first im­pres­sion was of fruity drink­a­bil­ity, with the hops re­ally kick­ing in from the first sip.

I could cer­tainly get pas­sion­fruit notes on the nose, which com­bined with a thin­nish mouth­feel and mod­est bit­ter­ness, made this a quaf­fa­ble drop.

As al­ways, we prob­a­bly started drink­ing with the beer a bit too cold to fully get the flavour, and Hugh com­mented that as his warmed up, he found the hops be­came more prom­i­nent.

If you drink enough beer and take no­tice of what is in it, you can start to pick up on cer­tain in­gre­di­ents.

I now find Galaxy hops, which fea­tures in this pale ale, gives an un­mis­tak­able whack as soon as you be­gin to pour it into the glass – Gage Road Sin­gle Fin and Wild Yak, too, fea­ture these hops.

At 4.8% al­co­hol con­tent it is a full-strength of­fer­ing.

This is a supremely drink­able beer. And well worth a try.

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